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There has been 10 years since the first version of Delicious, a social bookmarking app, was released and the world never looked back on how they archived their favorite web sites. Delicious was neglected until not long ago, but, by that moment, newer services seized its throne, such as Pinboard.

Diigo has been around since 2005 and it moved away from similar apps over time by offering tools to highlight and annotate on web pages. The service raised the bar with the inclusion of collaborative and social network and its recent redesign was the icing on the cake to transform Diigo into a standout utility.

Join us to find out the best ways to use Diigo’s resourceful features.

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I love taking pictures. I also like sharing the images I take, showing them off to the world in style, and offering others the opportunity to own the artworks I create. It doesn’t sound like a particularly challenging feature list to satisfy, but my experience says differently, particularly when it comes to affordable solutions. Over the years, I have tried literally dozens of hosted site builders, content management systems and design-conscious networks in the hope of finding the desired blend, with only limited success.

There have been a few close misses. I’m impressed with many elements of Behance‘s ProSite system, particularly on the design side of things, while at the other end of the spectrum, Weebly is affordable, customizable and easy-to-use, with some decent ecommerce options. Unfortunately, the former service’s $11/month price tag, and the latter’s inability to deliver dynamic galleries and photologs makes neither platform truly viable.

My most recent tour of the available services ended with the creation of a Tumblr blog — but I still think there must be a better option. Maybe that option will be Portfoliobox. This one-year-old Stockholm-based outfit has already amassed 62,000 users, which is hardly surprising given the generous feature-set offered even for free account holders. But does it deliver on its promises?

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Everyone’s taking the time to archive and share every beautiful thing they see on Instagram these days. Far more than just a simple snapshot, for most of us an Instagram photo requires just the right angle, just the right field of vision, and just the right filter. The finished work, far from being a real photo, is a little bit of art that anyone can make.

Short phrases are just as important these days. We think up the perfect witty 140 character phrases in response to everything happening around us, just for the @replies and retweets. But unlike Instagramed photos, there’s none of the timeless, artistic effects to our snippets of digital conversation.

Notegraphy is a brand new app that’s designed to bring the sense of wonder and essence of art to snippets of text. It’s a fun new way to share ideas, one that I’ve taken a liking to since I first tried it several months back.

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Web apps, for the most part, have taught us that we didn’t need all the features rich desktop apps offered. Most people don’t need every feature in Word, so Google Docs or even simpler tools like Draft were enough. Mobile apps have mostly continued the trend, with apps that have far fewer features.

The Lucidchart team has shown us, though, that web apps don’t have to be basic. Their web app takes on Visio and OmniGraffle — and does a great job competing. And now, they’ve made yet another full-featured app for the web, this time to revolutionize rich print and digital publishing with the brand-new Lucidpress.

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Most of us take it for granted that our calendar and contacts are synced right along with our email. It usually just works, and there’s nothing to think about — that is, until you need to move to a new email service. If Google just decided to stop allowing Gmail data to sync outside the Gmail apps, or Microsoft decided to shut down Outlook.com, your email wouldn’t be the only thing at stake. If anything, your contacts and calendar are the most vulnerable part of that equation.

We’ve got open standards for contact and calendar syncing, so it shouldn’t be this hard to make it just work, everywhere, and then build from there to make contacts and calendars work the way they should in this interconnected age. That’s exactly what the Fruux team has attempted to accomplish, and this year, there’re far closer to that dream than the last time we looked at their service.

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If you’ve ever tried turning pictures into a video slideshow complete with nice yet subtle animations and music you’re licensed to share, you’ve likely wondered why it’s not easier. It’s at best something that’ll take you a half hour in an app like iMovie or Windows Movie Maker, and that’s if your internet upload speed is decent. Making a video online sounds ludicrous at first bluff, since web apps are usually relatively slow and cumbersome to use.

But not Evver. It’s a web app designed solely to turn your pictures into beautiful music videos, and is the only web app I’ve ever seen that dumbfounded me with its speed. We looked at it back in July, but it’s grown up so much since then, it’s only right to take another look at it. Here’s why Evver is the app to use, on desktop or mobile, if you want to make an animated photo slideshow video.

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If your library is anything like mine, it’s likely filled with great books that you’ve only half-read. You bought them with the best of intentions, but it’s just hard to find the time to read all the books that come out. Plus, it can be rather expensive to keep an up-to-date tech book library.

Safari Online, started in part by O’Reilly Press, has been the online tech library of record for years, with an extensive catalog of books from O’Reilly, Wiley, Peachpit, and more for your online reading pleasure with a subscription. And now, they’ve reinvented themselves with the new Safari Flow. More than an online eBook library, it’s an attempt to make longform books relevant to the Twitter generation of professionals.

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The prevalence and compactness of high quality photographic equipment today is fantastic. The always-there, always-on nature of the smartphone makes missing a photo opportunity a rare occurrence. We’ve always captured parties, weddings, births and graduations, but we’re now able to fill in the gaps between these big events by recording everyday happenings, which are often just as precious, and are usually a great deal more intimate. These life-documenting images are stored as digital files, so they are memories which we will forever have access to.

Well, it should be forever. But ever since digital photography became the norm, we’ve all shared one problem – what do you do with all those images? As a committed DSLR photographer, I’ve filled hard drives with my camera’s output alone, so the increased photographic output made possible by my phone is a serious problem. Sure, you can back up online, but most options are worrisome or expensive, or a combination of the two.

Both Google and Apple have, in recent times, sought to address this issue. Google+ and Photostream both provide automatic cloud backups, and both also provide later access to your images online. A new service called Loom (still in private beta) thinks it can do better still. It provides automatic backup, 5GB of free space, Mac and iOS apps, as well as a web interface. But does it provide a compelling alternative to the built-in OS backup systems?

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In the digital lives of today, chronology is everything. Our experiences are mapped out via timelines, and every turn of events is a narrative without a beginning or an end. This is a change of culture which has mostly been brought about by the concurrent social and mobile revolutions. Together, they have supplied us with the platforms and the technologies to make both real-time updates, and later access to them, a reality.

This functionality, of course, opens up the possibility of constructing compelling stories from real-life events. Sadly, the selection of elegant, reader-friendly tools with which we can deliver our reports is painfully limited. Social networks are nothing better than pragmatic, and the structure of a blog is not inherently suited to multimedia.

Hence, I’m very interested in trying Line. It is a new platform dedicated entirely to the creation of multimedia-rich timelines, and their subsequent presentation in a beautifully minimal, Medium-like design. But can it really provide the format that digital storytelling has been crying out for?

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Did I get geekier over the years or did coding just become mainstream? With so many youngsters online, it was foreseeable that a great share was peeking beneath the surface of the web at those huge walls of code. Using recent services, such as GitHub and StackOverflow, it has never been so easy to solve doubts and receive feedback. Communities became larger as new users flew into the adventure of creating code to call their own instead of relying on WordPress themes.

We still needed a tool to put all this learning to work — a truly universal service we could carry anywhere regardless of the inclemencies. That’s where CodeAnywhere stands out, offering the versatility of a web service and native alternatives to every mobile platform imaginable (there’s even a BlackBerry app!), without ever waiving the great features you’ll find out in this review.

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