Posts Tagged

RSS

Self-hosted web apps are a great option if you’re worried about your favorite service going offline. Google Reader’s shutdown has made that potential painfully obvious, and yet, most of the best alternate RSS services are still hosted apps that could be shutdown on a whim. Or, if they’re hosted on Amazon S3 like so many services are these days, they’ll go offline along with a significant portion of your apps if Amazon has a bad day.

JellyReader is a new, simple RSS reader app that, while not self-hosted yet, is designed to make sure you can never lose your RSS reader data. Instead of trusting someone else’s cloud with your data, it stores your feeds and saved articles in your Dropbox or Google Drive account.

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There’s been an explosion in new RSS feed readers since Google Reader was shut down, but most of the best are are only designed to help you read your feeds from an app or the web. The brand-new throttle is a brilliantly reinvented RSS reader app that not only makes it simple to read your feeds on any device, but also helps you discover the very best feeds in curated lists and based on your interests.

Throttle starts off with a simple, light-colored UI that makes it easy to read all of your feeds. You can import your feeds from your OPML file or add them directly in the app or with throttle’s bookmarklet, then organize them into groups so you can read feeds about similar topics together. There’s the sharing options you’d expect, as well as an option to save articles for later reading right in the app.

Then, what’s really great in throttle is its Discovery tools. You can browse through popular sites, find stuff you’d be interested in reading, and follow lists of sites curated by throttle readers. We’ve put together a list of all of the AppStorm sites you can follow directly on throttle, as well as lists of some of our favorite Web and Mac app blogs, and you can do the same with your favorite sites.

Go try throttle!

Whether you’ve already found an app to replace Google Reader, or have given up on RSS feeds altogether, you’ve got to try out throttle. It’s a brilliant new RSS reader experience that’ll help you discover great new sites to follow, looks great on every device, and is 100% free. Go try it out, then follow our AppStorm RSS lists to keep up with our articles and the sites we follow right on throttle with one click!

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Google is no stranger to closing down services they feel have run their course, with Google Reader being a prime example. One popular service that has been on everybody’s “will they/won’t they” list for many years has been FeedBurner, a service that provides detailed statistics and tools for RSS feeds.

FeedBurner has received no updates in years and many of its features (such as its API and AdSense integration) have been discontinued. Many websites, such as 5by5 and 512 Pixels, have moved away from the service simply because all the signs point to it being shut down.

Earlier this year, a service called FeedPress (previously known as URI.LV) appeared with the aim to provide a worthwhile, and viable, alternative to FeedBurner. Let’s see how it compares, and whether it’s ready to take the RSS synchronization crown.

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Nearly all of the apps, platforms and services we write about on AppStorm are pretty specific in their purpose. Twitter sticks to restricted-length communications, YouTube focuses on video clip-based entertainment, and Evernote does nothing other than document filing. One app, one task. It works pretty good.

Given that we use many of these apps on a daily basis, you have to wonder why there haven’t been more attempts to combine some of these services. FriendFeed was, perhaps, the most prominent and successful entry into the mashup genre, although it fell by the wayside, despite a peak of 1.2m unique visitors per month.

The makers of Needly clearly feel that the fusion of web-apps is an idea worth revisiting. Billed as “Google Reader + Basecamp + WordPress,” it seems intent on providing a hub of browser-based services. Is this the plain madness it sounds like, or rather some kind of genius idea that should have been done already? Read on to find out.

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My wife and I recently moved to a new-to-us townhouse. Moving’s never easy, but it’s at least gotten us to go through our clothes and stuff, clearing out what we’ll likely never use again and organizing what we’ve kept so we’ll find it easier. It’s still a work in progress, but should be an improvement once we’re settled in.

So it goes with moving to new apps. Google Reader’s demise has forced us all to find a new home for our RSS feeds, and that’s likely made it the perfect time to change how you approach RSS. Fever’s made it easier for me to find the top stuff in the news each day, without having to read through all of my feeds, and finding new apps that work with it has been a fun process. I still essentially read my feeds the same, but I sure enjoy my current setup more than I did Google Reader.

Has the move away from Google Reader changed anything for you? Do you check RSS feeds more or less often with your new app? Or, have you given up on RSS altogether, opting instead for social networking and news aggregators?

RSS seems to be a seriously hot technology again. In recent weeks, there has been an extraordinary deluge of apps being released in response to Google Reader’s shutdown. Some of these are trying to tempt prospective users by offering innovative extra features, but many are happy to provide a clone-like experience. There are, however, some apps which have built on Reader’s foundations, but have added their own refinement, particularly in the direction of minimalist design, Digg and AOL being prime examples.

A new invite beta service named MnmlRdr, which has somewhat stayed under the radar thus far, is a promising new entry in this last category. I’m trying to find out whether it is an undiscovered gem, or whether it should be left in the shade. (more…)

Google Reader died sometime in the wee hours today, with not so much as a Google Doodle to remember it. Google’s leaving Reader’s data in Takeout export for 2 more weeks, but after that, Google Reader will be little more than a memory. It’s high time to move on, if you haven’t already.

We’ve rounded up the 5 best apps to help you move away from Google Reader, all of which are great options. But that’s not all. There’s tons of other RSS readers, including the brand-new Aol. Reader that our writer Justin loved, and many others that we’ve reviewed and that you’ve let us know in the comments that you love. Today, there’s an RSS reader app for everyone, whether you want to install an app on your own server (like Fever, which is what I switched to), would rather see your feeds as a magazine, or want something that is the perfect copy of Google Reader.

That’s why we’d love to know what RSS app you’ve switched to. Select your choice in the poll, then let us know why you chose that app in the comments below.

The end is finally here: Google Reader gets shut off, for good, on Monday, July 1st. Well before then, you should be celebrating your independence from Google’s feed reader, with an app that works just as good — or perhaps even better for your needs — than Google Reader ever did.

In the months since Google first announced they were going to shut down Google Reader, a ton of new RSS reader apps have been released, and many older, less known ones have become popular all over again. It’s actually a great time if you’re a fan of RSS readers, and chances are you’ll find yourself happier with one of the alternates today than you were with Google Reader.

But you’ve got to move now, before Google turns Reader’s power off. Here’s the apps you need for this weekend project — one that should take a whole of 5 minutes if you don’t get distracted reading through your feeds. (more…)

As many of you may know, Flipboard has started to become a pretty reliable RSS reader. Over the last year or so, it has continually added features and gotten better. In their last update, they added a feature that I thought was pretty neat and really gives the user a way to make Flipboard even better: Flipboard Magazines.

Not only that, but they also added a button you can add to your bookmark bar so that when you are surfing the web, you can add content to your magazine that you make. Then, you can tweak the magazine online to your heart’s content. It just might be the perfect way to share the stuff you love online.

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When Google announced it would be shutting down its Reader service on July 1 of this year, it left many customers of the popular RSS service feeling stranded. Many of the most popular alternatives, such as Feedly and The Old Reader, have had to beef up server capacity and bandwidth.

Meanwhile, other company’s, such as Digg, are planning their own upstarts to fill the void. In the meantime, customers have some time to experiment with various services and decide on which they wish to land. One of the newest is CommaFeed, which aims to be a complete alternative to Google Reader, but can also do a whole lot more in addition to being a simple web app. (more…)

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