Posts Tagged

Photography

I love taking pictures. I also like sharing the images I take, showing them off to the world in style, and offering others the opportunity to own the artworks I create. It doesn’t sound like a particularly challenging feature list to satisfy, but my experience says differently, particularly when it comes to affordable solutions. Over the years, I have tried literally dozens of hosted site builders, content management systems and design-conscious networks in the hope of finding the desired blend, with only limited success.

There have been a few close misses. I’m impressed with many elements of Behance‘s ProSite system, particularly on the design side of things, while at the other end of the spectrum, Weebly is affordable, customizable and easy-to-use, with some decent ecommerce options. Unfortunately, the former service’s $11/month price tag, and the latter’s inability to deliver dynamic galleries and photologs makes neither platform truly viable.

My most recent tour of the available services ended with the creation of a Tumblr blog — but I still think there must be a better option. Maybe that option will be Portfoliobox. This one-year-old Stockholm-based outfit has already amassed 62,000 users, which is hardly surprising given the generous feature-set offered even for free account holders. But does it deliver on its promises?

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The prevalence and compactness of high quality photographic equipment today is fantastic. The always-there, always-on nature of the smartphone makes missing a photo opportunity a rare occurrence. We’ve always captured parties, weddings, births and graduations, but we’re now able to fill in the gaps between these big events by recording everyday happenings, which are often just as precious, and are usually a great deal more intimate. These life-documenting images are stored as digital files, so they are memories which we will forever have access to.

Well, it should be forever. But ever since digital photography became the norm, we’ve all shared one problem – what do you do with all those images? As a committed DSLR photographer, I’ve filled hard drives with my camera’s output alone, so the increased photographic output made possible by my phone is a serious problem. Sure, you can back up online, but most options are worrisome or expensive, or a combination of the two.

Both Google and Apple have, in recent times, sought to address this issue. Google+ and Photostream both provide automatic cloud backups, and both also provide later access to your images online. A new service called Loom (still in private beta) thinks it can do better still. It provides automatic backup, 5GB of free space, Mac and iOS apps, as well as a web interface. But does it provide a compelling alternative to the built-in OS backup systems?

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Photos are for memories, moments you cannot bear to ever forget. They can also be a way that people express themselves: through composition and careful artistic thought. Sometimes the best photographs are just a mistake. Other times, the photographer happens to be in the right place just when the beautiful fill moon begins to rise behind clouds of rain and storms that are headed elsewhere. Whatever the case is, what’s the point of capturing a scene if no one sees it? That’s why I joined 500px just over a year ago.

There’s not a community like it, nor will you find images equal to that of its contributors. You could call it the Dribbble of photography. In fact, even if the site were rundown, as Flickr now is, the photos would still keep it up at the top. But that’s not the case. In fact, Flickr has some major competition over at 500px. The question is, how much better is it? (more…)

These days, it’s essential for visual artists of all disciplines to have an online presence so that their work can be found, followed and talked about in the industry. And there are indeed plenty of web apps one can use to create portfolio sites, with something for everyone and various feature sets. But what if you’re looking for something clean, elegant and easy to use, that lets your work do the talking?

The enthusiastic team behind Salon.io believe they have the answer – their still-in-the-works app allows you to create stunning showcases of your art with minimal effort, while retaining the flexibility to be customized as much as you need. But how does it fare against the competition? Let’s give it a try and find out! (more…)

Weddings are some of the most memorable occasions we attend, whether you’re participating or merely in attendance and, if it’s your special day, you’ll likely want to save the memories of the day forever. Lots of people hire wedding photographers to capture these moments officially but friends and family will inevitably still shoot their own, most likely on a smartphone. Wouldn’t it be cool if you could get them all, and aggregate them into an online album for you to access later?

That’s where uSnap.us comes in. uSnap.us allows you to “see your wedding through your guest’s eyes” by getting them to download an app which, in turn, takes their images and publishes them to an online gallery. A very interesting concept, uSnap.us could be a fantastic way to capture any event from a number of perspectives without having to chase after attendees to get ahold of shots afterwards. (more…)

Jux.com is a publishing platform which allows users to showcase their work in a streamlined portfolio format with no prior knowledge of coding or web design. Filling a void somewhere between Flickr and Blogger, Jux strives to set itself apart by being a publishing platform for creative professionals.

Users not only have the ability to quickly and easily post block quotes, articles, photos, videos, slideshows and top-10 countdowns, but also the tools to do so in a beautifully organized and fully intuitive gallery format. Jux.com was launched just a few short months ago, but it is already demonstrating why good design and approachability can lead to a substantial following. The rest of this post will delve into Jux and discuss the many benefits it can bring to your creative ventures.

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Over the past several years, there was an avalanche of photo sharing and showcasing web apps. Interestingly, though, most of these have been aimed at letting you quickly share simple pictures, rather than being designed around professional photography like Flickr. Facebook usage exploded and it turned into the World’s largest photo sharing site, while services like Instagram and Twitpic picked up where Twitter dropped the ball on photo sharing. Flickr and Photobucket stayed around, but there’s been much less innovation on professional photo sharing.

500px is a great photo community with a rating system, editorial selections, and professional portfolios. With a great selection of beautiful photographs, and the tools to make your work shine, it seems much more like a Flickr competitor than many of the newer sites aimed at quickly sharing photos. But is it awesome enough to take on established players, each with their own breed of loyal followers? Let us go find out.

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Looking for the best way to store and share your photos? You’re not alone! There are many fantastic sites for photo sharing and we’ve rounded up the top twenty. One or more of these are bound to meet your needs and much more.

We’ve rounded up the top twenty absolute best photo storage and sharing sites, including pricing, storage, accepted file types and other core information to make your decision even easier.

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Flickr, Picasa or SmugMug—which is best? Which one best suits your needs and your budget? What kind of professional level features do you get with each? These are questions I’ve been asking for awhile and it’s now time to compare three of the most popular photo storage and sharing services available today.

In this comparison we’ll pit Flickr, Picasa and SmugMug against each other so you can see which would best suit you.

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If you’re into photography, specifically landscape photography, you’ll probably know it’s important to plan your shots according to the sun or the moon depending on the shot you want to get. Keeping track of sunrise or sunset times, the sun’s azimuth or maybe the moon’s current phase can be a difficult task. Fortunately, there’s an Adobe AIR app for that — The Photographer’s Ephemeris (TPE).

The Photographer’s Ephemeris calculates just about everything you need to know to get the right shots anywhere in the world with Google Maps integration. We’ll take a look at how you can use the app to plan your landscape photography to get those great shots.

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