Posts Tagged

HTML

Given that you’re reading an article on AppStorm, I think it’s safe to assume that you’re a savvy, astute kind of reader. So, I won’t need to tell you that the first rule of the internet is that you must have a website. Nor will I need to explain that code, in the case of most basic websites, is nowadays completely unnecessary. And I definitely don’t need to inform you that the selection of services now available to help with building an online presence is enormous.

You might be interested to hear about Webflow, though. Whereas most of the site builders already on the market are aimed purely at non-coders, this new kid on the web design block seems to be letting the technical folks get some respite from keyboard-based design.

Is this kind of hybrid the way forward? Or will it just annoy web designers wedded to the manual way of doing things?

(more…)

Twitter can be addictive. Once you get started with writing tweets, it can be difficult to stop. Unlike other social networks, Twitter has a wider sense of community outside of your own friends, largely because of the way hashtags can be used to comment on events as they happen and browse through tweets relating to a particular subject. Plus, it’s rather simple to churn out dozens of 140 character messages.

Whether you have been using Twitter for a few months or a few years, you may be surprised at just how many words you have put online through the service. Recently, Twitter announced plans for a feature many people had been asking for – downloading your Twitter archives.

Here’s how you can grab yours, and what you can do with it.

(more…)

About a month ago, I rounded up a set of 10 tiny but really useful free web apps for designers. Given how well the app ecosystem on the web has evolved over the years, there’s no reason to stick with the theme of designers, so here’s a list of 10 similar apps, but for web developers.

Made by one of the most prolific community of professionals on the web, for themselves and other like them. All these apps are simple, focused on doing one thing and doing it right. If you are a web developer, they all might come in pretty handy at some point or another.

(more…)

As the web has evolved over the last few years into a powerful, dependable platform, web apps have grown in popularity as well as complexity. There are web apps out there for pretty much anything you want to get done — even something as unthinkable a few years ago as replacing Photoshop for image editing. This development has come at a cost though — web apps are more powerful than ever with their own learning curves and subscription costs.

As has been the case with any popular platform though, the web has also been a breeding ground for utilitarian applications that do small things well, and at the unbeatable cost of free. In this post, I’ll be listing some of the best small design utilities that I’ve come to use on the web to get very specific tasks done. They’re tiny, focused and get the job done with little fuss. (more…)

Editor’s Note: After careful consideration, we have decided to remove this post. W3Schools does have some correct information that can be useful to beginners, but it also has a number of inadequacies as our readers have pointed out in the comments. Our post was not affiliated with W3Schools in any way, and we have deleted it since it the inaccurate information in W3Schools’ sites could be especially misleading for beginning developers, the very audience of this article. If you’d like more information on the problems with W3Schools, please check out http://www.w3fools.com/ to see some of the worst problems with their content.
We’re thankful for our engaged community of readers, and endeavor to have the highest quality content possible. This article wasn’t up to that standard, and we apologize for that. If you ever have any feedback about our content, please let us know and we’ll strive to take your advice to heart.

Formatted text. It’s either the best thing to ever happen to the world of computing, or the worst, depending on who you ask. Plain text is the simplest; you can read it on any computer or app, and it looks the exact same. Throw in some markup, whether something simple like Markdown or more complex like HTML or XML, and it’s a bit harder to write and a lot harder to read, but still, very useful if you’re any bit techie.

Rich text is somewhat of a mess, though. As we all know, one of the biggest problems with switching to web apps for Office files is that Microsoft Office formatting doesn’t always carry over correctly. Even basic rich formatting in comment boxes and simpler apps like Evernote often doesn’t copy/paste between apps very nicely.

I’m a plain text fan myself, and that’s one of the big reasons I’ve switched to Simplenote for all of my notes needs. Whenever I need a bit more formatting, I’ll throw in Markdown formatting, convert it HTML for publishing online, and I’m ready to go. I find it very nice to have all of my notes in an accessible format that works everywhere, and can be useful even if Simplenote disappeared tomorrow.

So, we’d like to know: what’s your favorite way to write text? Do you prefer to just write in plain text, or do you want to add a bit of extra style with Markdown or Textile? Or would you rather have a full featured rich text editor? Why? We’d love to hear your thoughts in the comments below!

Steve Jobs is perhaps best known for the groundbreaking, market-leading products he has introduced under his reign as Apple CEO. He and his team created products that have literally revolutionised industries, or even nearly created new markets for tablets and media players, and that’s what the general public recognise his work for. However, his time at Apple also contributed heavily to the development of the web, including some of the very web apps we used every day.

If you read this blog, you’re likely to have heard of Steve Jobs’ war on Flash and his notorious exclusion of the software on Apple’s mobile devices. Apple’s popularity has allowed them to have a massive influence on what technologies we use on the web, and if your an iPad or iPhone user, you won’t be using Flash because Jobs said no.

(more…)

HTML and CSS are the two most commonly used languages on the web. While it may not be the most advanced form of web development, every website made in the past decade uses both languages. Needless to say, there’s a lot to learn here, but that doesn’t mean tools can’t help. We’ve compiled a super list of super tools to take your markup from mediocre to macho.

(more…)

ThemeForest authors are always working hard at producing amazing themes, designs and templates, so it’s easy to miss all the fantastic new items coming through every day. I’ve rounded up 58 killer new themes and templates from ThemeForest for WordPress, HTML/CSS, PSD, Mobile, Email & Newsletter, Joomla and Magento. Check’em out!

(more…)

theatre-aglow
theatre-aglow
theatre-aglow
theatre-aglow