Posts Tagged

file sharing

Another day, another file sharing app, or so it seems. We’re spoiled for choice when it comes to services for sending files big and small over the web, and while it may seem like overkill, the truth is that today’s users are diverse in their usage habits and requirements, and a one-size-fits-all approach just doesn’t work in this context. So who is Shared good for?

Shared doesn’t bother with apps for multiple platforms or syncing files across devices: instead, it offers a cheap, easy-to-use web-based file sharing solution that works on desktops and mobile devices and is perfect for novice users and advanced file sharers who are tired of bloated apps with features they don’t use. Plus, you can get started with 100GB of space for free! Sound too good to be true? Let’s send some files across the interwebs and see if Shared is indeed all it’s cracked up to be.

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The simplest apps are typically designed for individuals. Everything from the original iPhone to minimalist writing apps to simple file sharing apps were designed to help you be more productive and enjoy your work better. Even Word started out as a pretty simple app that just ran on your personal DOS computer.

Then, over time, more and more features are added and the product goes enterprise. That used to always mean that the app would have way too many features aimed at businesses and be insanely complex for individual use, and someone would have to start the cycle all over with a new, simple tool. And yet, lately, a number of simple apps have started taking on business-focused features while still staying simple. It’s pretty magical to see.

Droplr‘s new Business plans are the original simple file sharing tool’s first shot at growing beyond their current file-sharing tool into something businesses rely on. Best of all, they’ve maintained their trademark simplicity while adding features that make sense for teams.

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I’m a huge Dropbox junkie. I’ve got 19 GB of free space that I’ve managed to secure over the years (being a student and inviting friends used to help, especially before Dropbox really exploded over the past few years). But cloud storage is tricky, and I’m the paranoid type who believes you should never rely on only one storage solution — even if it is “in the cloud.”

I was intrigued when I heard about another cloud-solution that claimed to offer a few advantages to the Dropbox setup. It’s called NTI MiST. NTI has been in the software game for a long time, and have seen tremendous success in the industry. Read on to find out whether MiST continues to improve on their sterling reputation, or if it can replace or work alongside Dropbox.

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Sadly, much of the work done by those in the creative arts isn’t terribly creative. This isn’t because all the talented designers, musicians, film-makers and photographers out there aren’t capable of producing works of stunning originality. It is actually due to the irritatingly small amount of time that they can dedicate to making beautiful things, and the frustratingly large volume of time dedicated to the trials associated with a service-based profession.

One such trial is the toing and froing of work between the professional and the client. Many of the platforms that are technically capable of performing this task are not focused on the client-facing niche of file sharing, and as a result, few prioritize both straightforward operation and high quality presentation.

This is why I think the concept of Sitedrop, a new beta hot off the Betaworks press, makes sense. Based on Dropbox for storage and hosting, Sitedrop wants to make the delivery of your work within a beautiful interface as simple as moving a file. Is that too much to ask? (more…)

Cloud storage solutions like Dropbox and Google Drive are fantastic, but they don’t solve all the file-sharing needs you would have online. For starters, they require you to have an account to use them, and there’s no anonymity in sharing the file itself.

In the course of using the internet, you will often need different file-sharing solutions for different tasks. There is no one-size-fits-all service that gets everything done. So here are the best services for file-sharing, depending on what you need to do.
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No matter how many team communications apps you’ve got, odds are your team still ends up using Twitter as the watercolor and txt messages or email or Twitter DMs for private one-to-one messages. They’re just easier. We’re all already used to using them, so why not just use them to communicate with our colleagues at work too?

But what if you had a team chat app that actually was easier to use for everyone? Slack is the newest shot at reinventing team chat, and it’s nice enough that our writing team at AppStorm has fallen in love with it. It’s real-time chat, private messaging, and archiving with search across everything in an app that’s simple to integrated in your team’s workflow. Here’s what’s great about Slack, and why it’s the team chat app your team should give a try.

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The file storage and sharing marketplace is a landscape heavily populated with services. There’s good reason for this: a lot of people need to move a lot of files about, a lot of the time. Little wonder, then, that Dropbox is valued at over $4bn, and Box has managed to raise, over several rounds of funding, a total of $309m. These heavyweights provide large amounts of storage and access to files via nearly any internet-connected device.

In recent times, though, a slightly different, nimbler, quicker kind of platform has become popular. The first of this type – and, perhaps, the genre-defining player in this field – was Droplr. Since its launch in 2009, it has provided a remarkably simple and fast method of getting files online and shared. A younger competitor, CloudApp, has also entered mainstream use, and clearly there are plenty more startups which feel that this is still a lucrative file-storage niche.

One such service is Cloudup. The unique selling point of this cloud platform is its delivery of uploaded files, of nearly any type, in streams, which act as multimedia playlists. But is this focus on the recipient really the new, killer feature in the crowded file-sharing arena?

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The web is chock-full of cloud storage services these days, and that’s actually a good thing: you can choose from a vast range of apps with different features and pricing and opt for one that suits your needs and budget perfectly. I personally prefer Dropbox because it lives on my desktop, syncs files across all my devices and allows for easy file sharing with clients, colleagues, bandmates and friends.

Suyara is the latest contender to enter the ring, and comes in a-swinging with multiple plans for home and business users, a flexible file management UI, file previews and more. Today we’re going to pair up this new service from Spain to see how it fares against the heavyweights, and whether it can knock out the competition. Let’s glove up!

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We often joke at AppStorm that the majority of web apps are project management apps, but there’s one other category that seems to have more than its share of contenders: file sharing apps. From beautifully simple apps like Droplr and CloudApp, to file sync-and-share services like Dropbox and Box.net, to apps for selling files online, to Bittorrent and the hordes of semi-shady services for sharing, um, very large files, the web’s truly full of file sharing services.

That’s sensible, seeing as we all need an easy way to share our digital creations online, but one has to wonder if there could possibly be any more innovation in this space. After all, there’s many very simple file sharing apps that are beaufiully designed. What more could one ask for?

How about instant uploads, in-browser previewing of 150+ filetypes, and a way to share sets of files without signing up for an account? Would that spark your interest? If so, Jumpshare might be the file sharing app you’ve been waiting for.

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Earlier this month we covered several apps for sending files online and even asked you which were your favorites – and over half of you said you use Dropbox. While that’s great for sending across files, it’s not the best choice for collaboration, especially if you need a place to discuss the files you’re sharing and what you’re doing with them.

Glassboard wants to be that place – a meeting room where you can share files securely and talk about what you’re working on, without having your privacy invaded. The app allows you to invite friends, colleagues and clients to view and share photos and files in a private environment and is simple to use. Is this the collaboration tool you’ve been looking for? Let’s find out.
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