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Content

One of the great things that the web has brought us is the ability to find and create content for people to read. With blog services, magazine curation, and other social media apps, the web has given the average person the ability to create something of quality, using just the web. Before, you had to work for a company that would provide you with the tools to create good quality on the web or really know how to use the web tools, whereas now, just about anyone can do this.

Take for example Flipboard, who has come on to become a solid application for both reading and now curating content for others. When they first started out, they came onto the scene with a solid iPad app to consume your RSS feeds and other news that you wanted to know about. Slowly over time, they opened up a new side of their business by not only letting the average user consume content, but gave them the ability to curate it as well.

Now, they have opened this up even further to expand to the web, which has now created an application that can be used by many more people. Let’s take a look at Flipboard for the Web and see how this can be used in a variety of different ways.

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Whenever I find a service claiming that it “collects and organizes files”, I wonder “Why?”. This is not only curiosity, but an essential part of what we do here: “What’s the purpose of a new app of this kind in a world with Evernote and Springpad?”. This helps digging into the mind of its creators, allowing us to guess what issue made the developers think of a new solution.

Thus it is, when inquiring why a service such as Iceber.gs is born. Were its developers unaware of its competition or it definitely brings something completely new to the game? Let’s find out together — and then if you like it, we’ve got some exclusive early access codes for you below!

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Blogging has changed. When the first blogging services started popping around ’98, most people used them as open diaries. Over time, blogs went further, and the concept of a diary fell apart. Still, they were still personal, but instead of carrying the events of our days, we now write opinions we believe are worth sharing (and some still use them as diaries — they’re just fewer and farther between). From diaries to opinion repositories, there’s one quality of blogs that’s never vanished: they’re personal.

Not only have bloggers reshaped their content, but the platforms have followed the transformation as well. From WordPress and Blogger to Tumblr and more, customization has always been an essential part of blogging. It’s like hanging pictures in your bedroom, making your space feel yours. Then came the digital magazines, like Svbtle and Medium, and theming became passé. Personality became lodged in the content. Now comes Roon, which abdicates most of the customization to leave place to what defines our generation: content.

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When my mother gifted me a copy of Haruki Murakami’s IQ84 a few weeks ago, I felt weird holding reading material in my hands. I suddenly realized that most of the reading I did through 2012 was on screens, and consisted mainly of blog posts and articles online. While I’m not happy that my balance of reading literature and non-fiction is totally out of whack, I now understand that reading online is undeniably a big part of my life.

That said, it’s great to have tools to keep track of what you read on the web — I subscribe to RSS feeds aplenty using Google Reader, save stuff for later with Pocket, and have set up a recipe with IFTTT to push links from my favorited tweets to Pocket as well. But wouldn’t it be nice to have a community of fellow fans of longform content, to share new things to read with? Enter Readingly.

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With advancements in technology, we are starting to see reading material convert over to the web and digital format more and more. Take books and magazines for example, for the first time this past year, Amazon outsold ebooks over actual physical ones. That right there goes to show you that publishers and consumers are starting to embrace the digital market and see the need for it.

Over the past several months, I have started to see some cool web apps that let you create content online and share them with the world. For example, the one that I am looking at today, called Glossi, lets you create your own online magazine. After getting to use it for a little while, I found that this can be used for both professionals as well as amateurs alike.

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If there has been a company that changed the Web more than any other, I’d have to argue that that company would be Google. Not because of anything that they specifically have done – which is plenty – but because of the deeper, longer-lasting effects that search (primarily through Google) has had on Web content.

Commonly known as SEO (search engine optimization), the Web has been changed by this emphasis on being found via Google or (insert other search engine here).

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Quick Look posts are paid submissions offering only a brief overview of an app. Vote in the polls below if you think this app is worth an in-depth AppStorm review!

In this Quick Look, we’re highlighting Pulse CMS. The developer describes Pulse as a simple CMS designed for small websites. It enables you to add content management to an existing site in five minutes. Define the “blocks” on your website you wish to be editable and Pulse provides an easy to use backend to make edits right from your browser. Pulse also includes a blog, gallery manager and contact form; everything you need to power a small website.

Read on for more information and screenshots!

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Based on feedback from our wonderful readers, we’ve decided to slightly change our content formatting and broaden some of the subjects we’ll cover. As already shown, we’ll also begin providing screencasts along-side applicable posts, such as how-tos and reviews, when possible.

More info. on the content changes after the jump.

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