Posts Tagged

coding

If you’re a programmer, or if you spend a significant amount of your day working with plain text for any reason, you’ll surely have at least heard of Sublime Text. The one paid text editor that’s won over both Emacs and VI fans, Sublime Text is the gold standard in text editors. And, it’s cross platform, so you can run in on your Mac, Windows, or Linux PC.

There’s only one place it won’t run — Chrome OS. And, of course, it won’t run on any Mac or PC if you don’t have a copy — plus, keeping your settings synced can be a pain at best. That’s why Caret is so exciting. It’s a full-featured code editor in an offline Chrome web app that can run anywhere Chrome runs, for free, and it’ll keep your settings synced along with the rest of your Chrome data.

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Websites are rarely perfect. They’re either horribly designed or simply lack the functionality to perform in 2013. Worse still, many website owners refuse to develop mobile version leaving smartphone users struggling to use their sites.

Tomodo is a platform for modding websites and sharing your improved version with the world. It seems like a strange idea. How can you mod a website that isn’t yours?

Using clever coding and the ingenuity of a growing community Tomodo is now home to dozens of modded website. Everything from Time Magazine to Ebay is altered. Are they any good though? Maybe you could do better.

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Over the last few years, Google’s Chrome has steadily gained in popularity over all of its competitors. It is rare to find someone who doesn’t use Chrome as their default browser, especially in the web design community. As a result, there are tons and tons of extensions geared towards making the lives of designers and developers easier.

Here is my selection of some of the best from these extensions.

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I’m a geek. I love things like web development, design and blogging. I love writing and photography. I adore music. In fact, I love them so much that I take pictures, write and design for a living. In fact, despite the fact that I have my own blog and maintain other websites dedicated to personal interests, like music, I’m starting my own creative services company in the upcoming month.

Because I’m initially going to be the sole proprietor of this company, starting it is easier than you might think both legally and financially. But I do need a website. And even though I love coding and web development, I also hate it (not unlike many professional coders I know). So I’d prefer to leave the fine art of web coding to the professionals. That’s why I’m considering Squarespace 6. Things have changed a lot since we last looked at Squarespace. Let’s find out what’s new.

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About a month ago, I rounded up a set of 10 tiny but really useful free web apps for designers. Given how well the app ecosystem on the web has evolved over the years, there’s no reason to stick with the theme of designers, so here’s a list of 10 similar apps, but for web developers.

Made by one of the most prolific community of professionals on the web, for themselves and other like them. All these apps are simple, focused on doing one thing and doing it right. If you are a web developer, they all might come in pretty handy at some point or another.

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If you’ve ever developed websites at all, chances are you’ve used your browser’s View Source option. It’s a great way to look at what’s going on behind the scenes, and if you know what you’re looking for, you can often use it to see what frameworks and CMS powers the site. Sometimes, you’ll even find a special easter egg, ASCII art, or message hidden in the source.

In most browsers now, you can use the Inspect Element view to find out even more about the site you’re on, easily seeing what fonts are used on the page, or the individual images used to make the site look the way it does. For the curious among us, it’s a great way to see how others put their sites together.

I personal look at other sites’ source all the time, which made me wonder how many others compulsively check site source. Do you ever view the source of sites you visit? Or do you never think about what’s going on behind the scenes in your browser?

With so much of our information being pushed to the Web, not knowing the basics of web coding is going to become more and more of a hindrance. If you don’t know what a h1, h2, or blockquote is you’re going to find yourself at a severe disadvantage in the future.

While there are plenty of ways to learn the basics of coding, one interesting solution that has just come into the scene is Treehouse. With videos, tests, and badges, will Treehouse allow you to finally learn what you need to be learning?

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Editor’s Note: After careful consideration, we have decided to remove this post. W3Schools does have some correct information that can be useful to beginners, but it also has a number of inadequacies as our readers have pointed out in the comments. Our post was not affiliated with W3Schools in any way, and we have deleted it since it the inaccurate information in W3Schools’ sites could be especially misleading for beginning developers, the very audience of this article. If you’d like more information on the problems with W3Schools, please check out http://www.w3fools.com/ to see some of the worst problems with their content.
We’re thankful for our engaged community of readers, and endeavor to have the highest quality content possible. This article wasn’t up to that standard, and we apologize for that. If you ever have any feedback about our content, please let us know and we’ll strive to take your advice to heart.

If you use computers long enough, chances are you’ll eventually want to learn at least a little bit of programming. You can only hear so many stories about exciting new apps and whole businesses built from several thousands lines of code before you start thinking that you could do it, too. Problem is, it’s often daunting to get started programming. Most programming books almost seem too difficult, or else they start out so slow and basic that you’re bored before you even get started.

We clearly need a new way for the next generation of coders to learn how to program. Programming doesn’t have to be an exclusive thing only for über geniuses. And you don’t need a Stanford Computer Science degree for it, either. Codecademy is an exciting new web app that aims to make programming more approachable for everyone. Best of all, you can start off learning JavaScript, that all-important language for web apps. Let’s take a look.

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HTML and CSS are the two most commonly used languages on the web. While it may not be the most advanced form of web development, every website made in the past decade uses both languages. Needless to say, there’s a lot to learn here, but that doesn’t mean tools can’t help. We’ve compiled a super list of super tools to take your markup from mediocre to macho.

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