Posts Tagged

Chrome

Google’s geeky. Its homepage has always been spartan, and even the shade of blue used on its links are tested for performance. Its HQ is known for group bikes, indoor slides, yards mowed by goats and filled with inflatable deserts, the representatives of the web giant’s robot-themed mobile OS.

But Google’s also successful, wildly so. It’s a rare day when any internet connect human doesn’t touch at least one Google products. Not because we’re forced to, but because we want to. Google Search just works, and its popularity got us to try the rest of their apps. And you know what? Google Maps, Gmail, Docs, Chrome and more all work so good, most of us choose them because they work great. They may be spartan, but they sure do the job.

That’s not enough. The new Google, one increasingly infused with Google+ DNA since its launch 2 years ago, is focusing harder than ever on design. And features. And glasses, and driverless cars, and beating Dropbox, and more. It’s a busy — and shiny — new search giant, and that’s on showcase more than ever at this year’s Google I/O developer conference.

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Taming Flash Player

Adobe Flash used to be an essential part of our daily internet experience, but today, it feels more like a relic of the past. No major mobile device today ships with Flash — Apple notably never included it in iOS, and then Adobe itself dropped mobile Flash on Android last August. Microsoft even curtailed Flash in Windows 8, limiting it to running Flash on a pre-approved sites in the new Modern IE.

Even still, on the desktop you’ll often find that you need to use Flash. That’s why our writer Nathan Snelgrove just wrote an article on our sister site Mac.AppStorm on the best ways to avoid using Flash on your Mac.

It’s aimed mainly at Safari users, and even recommends using Chrome for Flash since it’s built-into Chrome. But, if you’re an IE or Firefox user on a Windows or Linux PC who’d rather get around using Flash, it’s got enough tips that you might find some of them helpful.

Continue Reading at Mac.AppStorm…

Ever get tired of typing everything that you need to write down? How about save your fingers a bit of work and use speech recognition to write for you? Better yet, how about do it in Chrome, for free, on any platform?

It might sound too good to be true, but Chrome now has speech recognition built-in, and there’s a new app from Digital InspirationDictation — that makes it easy to put it to use. You might never have to type in your notes again online!

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If you’re looking for a great markdown-powered plain-text writing app, there’s dozens of apps out there — native apps for your device, or web apps that’ll run anywhere. There’s awesomely minimalist writing apps like Typewriter, or newer apps like Draft that make it easy to track your document’s revisions and get others to check your work.

But even if you love web apps, and need something that’ll work on any platform, sometimes apps that run online aren’t the best option. And native apps … well, chances are they won’t run on all the computers you use.

How about something that combines the best of both worlds? That’s exactly what Textdown — an offline Markdown writing app for Chrome — is. Spoiler: it’s really great, too.

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Apps that enable you to send contact information and files from one device to another have been available for years now, but when it comes to sharing websites, email is often the best bet. Yup: if you want to open the page you’re looking at on your computer in your phone’s browser, often the easiest way to move the link around is emailing yourself. That just doesn’t seem right.

While many web browsers now offer the option of syncing open tab sessions between computers,  the way synchronization has been implemented is not always ideal since they only work with other versions of the same browser. What if you use Chrome on your computer and Safari on your mobile devices?

This is where SendTab can help, making it possible to push tabs from one browser to another, on any device. Let’s see if it holds up to its promise.

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Chromebook Pixel: A Puzzling Hardware + Software Combo

Yesterday, Google unveiled the latest addition to its Chromebook family: the Chromebook Pixel. Grabbing headlines with a starting sticker price of $1299, the device features a MacBook Pro-like high-resolution display and a price tag to match.

In this article, we’re going take a look at the Chromebook Pixel, how it stacks up to similar devices, and question why exactly the crew in Mountain View even bothered sending it to retail.

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The Chrome web browser has a great deal going for it: fast page rendering, a clean interface, powerful extensions, and the marketing of Google behind it. If there are any complaints to be made about it, though, I’ve found that it can be slow to launch when when you’re reopening it with a large number of tabs.

You may well have tried out Internet Explorer, Firefox, Safari, and any of countless other lesser known web browser, but you’ll likely find that Chrome’s not the only one with this problem. Chrome does, however, have a solution: Session Buddy. Session Buddy is an extension that could make your tabs easier to manage and help to dramatically improve Chrome’s performance. Let’s take a look.

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Every computer user has their own preferences when it comes to web browsers. Some might be in the favor of Firefox while others consider Google Chrome to be the best among them. If you ask me, Google Chrome is my favorite browser not just because it’s from Google, but because its simple, lightweight and easy to use with a gigantic library of web apps and extensions to improve the browsing experience.

However, all the extensions that are available in Chrome Web Store are definitely not be worth downloading. So, rather than wasting time looking for the perfect extensions for your browser, we have gathered a list of some of the best extensions available in Chrome App Store ranging from productivity to news to photography and more.

Let’s take a look.

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Unified notifications are everywhere these days, and are built into the latest version of every major mobile and desktop OS. On the web, though, notifications are a mixed bag. Chrome supports notifications from web apps, but you’ll have to have your favorite app open to get notifications, and few support them as is. You’re better off relying on email notifications and keeping Gmail open in Chrome all day if you don’t want to miss out on anything.

That is, unless you install Chime, a new beta extension for Chrome. It’s the notification center the web has been needing, and it just might make more sense than most mobile notification centers do anyhow. Let’s take a look.

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There are some fantastic web apps made for Google Chrome, thanks to the Chrome team’s dedication to showing off the power of web apps in their browser. We recently took a look at the new Chrome Legos, and 100,000 Stars is another great Chrome app that’s recently come out, fresh from the minds of the Google Data Arts Team.

It’s an interactive visualization of the stars in our “neighborhood” of the universe, and it’s an incredibly humbling and beautiful experience. You don’t have to use Chrome to run it, either — I had some success with the latest version of Firefox, and any browser that supports WebGL should be able to run it.

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