Posts Tagged

Chrome

There’s Alfred and Quicksilver for the Mac, tools that make help you get tons done just with your keyboard. On the PC, there’s Launchy that does much the same thing. And even in apps like Sublime Text, you can just type in the Command Palatte to get stuff done without resorting to hard-to-remember keyboard shortcuts or your mouse.

On the web, though, the best alternate we have is bookmarklets — typically javascript-powered bits of code that make sharing and tweaking sites simple. In Safari, you can access the first 10 in your bookmarks bar with simple CMD+number shortcut, but everywhere else you’ll have to click your bookmarklet or make workarounds for the ones you use most. It’s far from the efficiency of keyboard-driven launchers.

That is, unless you install the new Backtick.

(more…)

My former workplace had very restrictive IT policies and so every computer was locked down, which meant that to install any software, you needed the administrator password. And the last time Canonical released a new version of Ubuntu, it was a living nightmare for me. I needed to download that OS as quick as possible to write about it, but as anyone who has downloaded Ubuntu on day zero knows, it’s pretty much impossible to do that through the direct HTTP download. And here I was, stuck on a PC that wouldn’t let me grab it off the torrent like I usually do.

How I wish I knew about BitTorrent Surf at that time…

(more…)

If you’re a programmer, or if you spend a significant amount of your day working with plain text for any reason, you’ll surely have at least heard of Sublime Text. The one paid text editor that’s won over both Emacs and VI fans, Sublime Text is the gold standard in text editors. And, it’s cross platform, so you can run in on your Mac, Windows, or Linux PC.

There’s only one place it won’t run — Chrome OS. And, of course, it won’t run on any Mac or PC if you don’t have a copy — plus, keeping your settings synced can be a pain at best. That’s why Caret is so exciting. It’s a full-featured code editor in an offline Chrome web app that can run anywhere Chrome runs, for free, and it’ll keep your settings synced along with the rest of your Chrome data.

(more…)

There has been 10 years since the first version of Delicious, a social bookmarking app, was released and the world never looked back on how they archived their favorite web sites. Delicious was neglected until not long ago, but, by that moment, newer services seized its throne, such as Pinboard.

Diigo has been around since 2005 and it moved away from similar apps over time by offering tools to highlight and annotate on web pages. The service raised the bar with the inclusion of collaborative and social network and its recent redesign was the icing on the cake to transform Diigo into a standout utility.

Join us to find out the best ways to use Diigo’s resourceful features.

(more…)

Two years ago, Evernote bought out Skitch, the popular Mac screenshot annotation tool, and promptly ruined it. Perhaps it wasn’t that bad, but most Skitch fans were frustrated over the new version’s lack of features, and it took quite some time for Evernote to win us back to Skitch.

But now, they’ve taken Skitch’s best annotation features, mixed them with the original Evernote web clipper and their Clearly extension (which itself was another purchased app, Readable), and made the best tool to save online content yet. The brand-new Evernote Web Web Clipper 6 for Chrome is amazing, whether you’re wanting to save text-only copies of articles to Evernote or want to annotate sites and share them with others.

(more…)

Just under a week ago, Google officially launched the Chrome Desktop Apps in the non-beta version of Chrome for Windows and on Chromebooks. It’s not officially in Chrome for Mac or Linux just yet, but if you install Chrome Beta, you can use the Chrome desktop apps across all your computers today.

The desktop apps are actually really nice — in fact, they almost feel exactly like native apps on your Mac or PC, if it weren’t for the fact that they have to have Chrome running at the same time. The Chrome desktop apps work offline, can integrate with your peripherals, be launched individually from Launchpad or your Windows 8 start screen, can send push notifications, and in general just work like a native app. But then, when you’re on your PC at work, or hacking on Linux, you’ll have the same apps there too, at least if you’ve got Chrome syncing. It’s a really neat concept, one that’s already boasting support from Wunderlist, Pocket, and more with apps that look practically just like their native Mac counterparts.

It's Chrome, but it's a real app.

It’s Chrome, but it’s a real app.

Now, on the Mac we’ve had Fluid for years to turn web apps into quasi-desktop apps, and Chrome for Windows has let web apps run in their own chromeless window for quite some time. That’s nothing new. What is new is how native-app-like the new Chrome desktop apps are. They really don’t feel like web apps anymore.

So, will you be using them, or are you already using Chrome desktop apps? Or do web apps belong in a tab alongside your other sites? We’d love to hear your thoughts about Chrome desktop apps in the comments below!

Last week, few people were surprised to see Google launching their latest Nexus 7 tablet. That was rather expected. What surprised us all was the launch of the $35 Chromecast, a HDMI dongle to steam internet video from apps and the Chrome browser to your TV. The feature set and price were interesting, of course, especially after the failure of last year's Nexus Q and Google TV. But what was more interesting, perhaps, was the Chromecast's branding — with the Chrome browser's name, not Android — especially after it was discovered that the Chromecast is powered by a stripped-down Android.

AppleInsider has published a rather interesting piece speculating that Google will eventually drop the Android brand and focus everything on Chrome. Google already makes the majority of their money from search, and Android — despite its popularity and prevalence in smartphones, tablets, and even refrigerators — has yet to make much at all. The Chrome browser, though, is more directly aligned with Google's web interests since it keeps you on the web, where Google's already monetized their services.

It seems an unlikely stretch of imagination to think that Google would drop Android now, but the lack of a new version this year does seem odd. So what do you think? Will Google focus more on Chrome going forward, or will Android continue to be an equally significant part of Google's interests?

Recent statistics show that Chrome is solidly in third place in the “browser wars”. Perhaps the main reason for Chrome’s rapid growth over the past four plus years is the Chrome Web Store. The plethora of extensions and apps available for Chrome packaged in an accessible online store has enticed many users to make the switch.

I recently switched back to Chrome specifically for the productivity extensions. There were a few extensions I couldn’t live without and some I recently encountered having a good ol’ time perusing the Web Store. The result is a set of 15 extremely handy productivity extensions for Chrome. So, in some kind of order, here they are…
(more…)

Listening to music via a browser normally involves YouTube – and by association the terribly annoying Vevo. If I wanted advertisements before a song I’d turn on the radio. Soundcloud is an alternative but unfortunately caters mostly to the Alternative genre.

The Drive Tunes extension for Chrome however promises a seamless listening experience straight from your Google Drive. As with most things good and Googly – it’s free, it works and isn’t chock full of malware.

On the face of thing’s all is well. But is it usable? Is there even a point to a browser music player? Oh, and does it play nice with Google’s other offerings? The plot thickens.

(more…)

Imagine being launched into an unexplored world, without food or shelter, all alone and with an overarching fear for your hunger, sanity and health. That’s the context to Don’t Starve, a game all about surviving in a procedurally-generated wilderness made up of the resources you’ll need to survive and the dangers you’ll need to avoid. It’s a game that’s taken the Steam marketplace by storm, but most surprisingly, it’s also available as a web app in the Chrome Web Store.

It’s not everyday that a hyped Steam game is also available as game that’ll run in your browser, so we had to check it out.

(more…)

Page 1 of 512345
theatre-aglow
theatre-aglow
theatre-aglow
theatre-aglow