The Top 8 Killer Alternatives to Google Analytics

Google Analytics is one of the most well known website analytics around, not to mention being one of the best. Although Google Analytics is a fantastic app to tackle your site’s analytics needs, there are actually several other options available that many would argue are better choices. We’ve pulled together eight of the best alternatives to Google Analytics and some information about each; price, plugins, mobile apps, real-time tracking and requirements.

Which analytics app do you use and why? Read on to see if there’s anything more fitting for your needs or if you have something you’d recommend.

Google Analytics

Google Analytics

Google Analytics

Perhaps the most well known and most used, Google Analytics is king of the hill. It’s one of the most powerful analytics apps available and remains free, which makes it the most popular choice to date. There are plugins, tweaks and third-party apps for just about every platform available so integration should be a snap.

Among its greatness, it also has drawbacks and many argue quality flaws. Keep reading to see eight great alternatives for your analytics needs.

Mint

Mint

Mint

Every time I’ve looked into analytics apps several people always tell me they much prefer Mint over Google Analytics. Mint is self-hosted, so you have more control in that respect, but also offers real-time tracking and is extensible. Mint’s interface is clean and easy to read and navigate, so it’s a breeze to use.

Reinvigorate

Reinvigorate

Reinvigorate

Reinvigorate is one of my favorites and actually my personal analytics app of choice. The app offers real-time tracking, visitor “NameTags” (great for seeing who’s on your site), a desktop app and even heatmaps. The app design is fantastic and it’s a breeze to use; although it can be addicting watching your real-time data flow in.

  • Price: $10 per month, 14-day free trial
  • WordPress Plugin: Yes
  • Mobile App: No
  • Real-time data: Yes
  • Requirements: None
  • Developer: Sean McNamara
Clicky

Clicky

Clicky

Clicky probably offers the most features of any app listed here, including real-time tracking, various plugins, mobile apps, website widgets and a whole lot more. Along with piles of great features, Clicky also offers more price plans than other apps to best fit your needs and your budget. Clicky’s interface design wasn’t too appealing for me, but it does a great job at accomplishing its goal.

  • Price: Free, $6.99-$19.99 per month
  • WordPress Plugin: Yes
  • Mobile App: Yes
  • Real-time data: Yes
  • Requirements: None
  • Developer: Clicky
chartbeat

chartbeat

chartbeat

Chartbeat, like several of the other apps here, also offers real-time tracking but features an interface that’s more enjoyable to look at than just a pile of numbers or the typical line graph. It’s a clean looking and easy to use app that will be much more appealing to the average user rather than hardcore analytics users.

  • Price: $9.95 per month, 30-day free trial
  • WordPress Plugin: Yes
  • Mobile App: iPhone app (iTunes)
  • Real-time data: Yes
  • Requirements: None
  • Developer: Chartbeat Inc.
Woopra

Woopra

Woopra

Woopra takes a different approach to analytics and requires that you download a desktop client to handle your site’s incoming data. The app offers real-time tracking and a dark color scheme for its interface, making heavy use of icons and vibrant colors. With the features offered, Woopra is a great choice, especially since it’s free.

  • Price: Free
  • WordPress Plugin: Yes
  • Mobile App: iPhone app (iTunes)
  • Real-time data: Yes
  • Requirements: Desktop compatible with desktop client
  • Developer: iFusion Labs, LLC.
Piwik

Piwik

Piwik

Piwik is an open source analytics app that you’ll have to host yourself but offers everything from real-time tracking to mobile apps for iPhone and Android and is even offered in over 30 languages. It’s directly intended to be an alternative to Google Analytics and does a pretty dang good job of it.

  • Price: Free (open source)
  • WordPress Plugin: Yes
  • Mobile App: iPhone (iTunes) or Android app
  • Real-time data: Yes
  • Requirements: Self-hosted (PHP, MySQL)
  • Developer: Piwik
GoingUp

GoingUp

GoingUp!

GoingUp! takes a slightly different approach by pushing SEO tools along with the regular analytics app tools. The interface could use a some refinements but overall gets the job done. Among the piles of features the app sports, real-time tracking, heatmaps and mobile apps are nowhere to be seen. The app is free though so if you need easier to understand SEO tools, this might be worth checking out.

  • Price: Free
  • WordPress Plugin: Yes
  • Mobile App: No
  • Real-time data: No
  • Requirements: None
  • Developer: GoingUp!
KISSinsights

KISSinsights

KISSmetrics

While KISSmetrics is an analytics app, it takes a very different approach by focusing on the people visiting your site rather than pageviews. KISSmetrics does a great job of helping you focus on your visitors, site conversions, where future development should be and more aspects that truly help your site and your visitors.

  • Price: Free
  • WordPress Plugin: Unknown
  • Mobile App: No
  • Real-time data: No
  • Requirements: None
  • Developer: KISSmetrics

What Do You Use?

Each of these apps are fantastic in their own way and make for pretty great alternatives to Google Analytics. Do you use or plan on trying out one of the apps listed here? Or maybe you use an app we haven’t listed that you think should’ve been?


  • http://superdit.com aditia

    I still using google analytics for my blog, maybe I want to try the others, that have none requirement like you said, hope it easier to use

  • http://www.dkey.eu David Knaack

    What about etracker (www.etracker.com)?

  • http://adrusi.com/ Adrian

    sorry, about that, pressed enter in the URL field…

    I just got google analytics for my site because I wanted to see pageviews for individual posts. I’ve been using cloudflare for my analytics until now, but they give an option for automatically including google analytics code on every page.

  • http://www.haykranen.nl Hay

    Have been using both Clicky and Google Analytics for quite a while. For more in-depth statistics i use the latter, while Clicky is great for realtime monitoring, although the interface could use a little polishing.

  • http://julianwachholz.ch Julian

    Observerapp.com.

    Uses Cappuccino and is pretty cool, despite being closed beta… ;)

  • http://www.performable.com Kevin Karner

    Take a look at Performable which tracks every visitor to your website as an individual throughout their entire relationship with your product. Find undiscovered leads that you never knew were visiting your website.

    If you are interested in learning more I would be happy to get you setup. http://tungle.me/kevinkarner

  • http://mitchellhislop.com Mitchell Hislop

    I just started playing with Open Web Analytics, and it is pretty fantastic. DOMstreams, instant updates, free, hosted on your own servers, with no limits.

    This, coming from someone who is GAIQ and GACP…

    • http://velmont.no Velmont

      I’ve been using Piwik for a long time, but just found out about Open Web Analytics. I really look forward to trying it out, it looks very nice.

  • Anthony

    Woopra is my favorite by far

  • http://bradyjfrey.com Brady J. Frey

    I loved mint, beautiful and powerful, but it only handles a single website per installation. A bummer if you manage many websites, and most of us do.

    Analytics has been great for comparing metrics across domains and other businesses, not to mention full adword integration. Anyone know if the others have similar features?

  • http://www.skyglue.com Eric

    http://www.skyglue.com – offers retention analytics service, pretty niche tool…

  • http://icupcake.org Jordan

    I’ve stuck with Mint for over four years now because it’s really the best self-hosted option out there and the 3rd party plugins are awesome. In fact my most used would be the Nametags since I love to tag repeat visitors to see how often they stalk (or don’t!)

    Would use Reinvigorate more often but I am just disappointed that they pretty much screwed over their longtime users. I had been on there since ’07 and the best I got was a one-time 50% off annual? Lame.

  • http:/nervecentral.com David Crowther

    You need to consider two points when choosing your analytics service:

    1. Does it track goals or funnels. Just measuring visitors in a pretty graph is not enough. You need to know if users are converting (sign ups, sales, etc).

    2. Do you really want to give Google information about how many users are visiting your site and what percentage of those visitors are leaving straight away (bounce rate). If you use Google Analytics, you agree Google can use the information as they see fit, and they will use it in determining your ranking in the search results.

    Personally, I use a combination of Clicky, KISSMetrics and Mixpanel to track visitors and conversions, and view sales funnels.

    Of course, your mileage may vary.

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  • Jacob

    @David
    What makes you say that Google use the data from GA for ranking individual sites in search results?

    Sharing your data is optional, and in their FAQ it says specifically that it will not be used to rank search results:

    “Your website data will not be used to affect your natural search results, ad quality score or ad placement. Aggregate data across many customers will be used to improve our products and services. ”
    http://www.google.com/support/analytics/bin/answer.py?hl=en&answer=87515

    I have read several articles about whether or not Google are using bounce rate for ranking websites, but never one that took the time to actually test where the data may come from.

    I think it is much more likely that they are using data from their toolbar or looking at whether or not people perform a new search within 30 seconds of a clicking through to your website from the SERPs. I would speculate that data from both those datasets may be better than what can be gathered from GA.

  • http://nervecentral.com David Crowther

    @ Jacob

    I’d hate to think that you’d be satisfied with a few lines in their FAQ. Some companies (not all) lie to you and do bad things. It’s an unfortunate fact of business. I’m not saying you have to treat all businesses as if they swindling you, but if you have a choice who you provide sensitive information to, you should be doing your own due diligence.

    Google’s not perfect and you have to decide for yourself if you want to trust them.

    http://www.theregister.co.uk/2010/01/12/google_leaks_small_business_traffic_stats/
    http://www.theregister.co.uk/2009/12/07/schmidt_on_privacy/
    http://www.theregister.co.uk/2010/04/27/google_backtracks_on_ip_anonymization_claims/

  • http://www.gmbhnews.net create a mobile site

    I use piwik and haven’t look back since, I also use google analytics along with piwik and can strongly recommend both.

  • Supandi

    Whos.amung.us , is very good for simple real time analytics

  • http://www.praxismicro.com Jeff Booher

    I agree. Clicky is great, but the UI can use a little polishing.

    @Jordan – I received a lifetime discount for being in the Reinvigorate beta program. If you’ve had an account since ’07 and missed out, maybe you should email the Reinvigorate team?

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  • http://www.uvvoka.com carrie

    Tried to install piwik to replace analyser but backtracked really quickly over the confusion of installing piwik on my host.

    Copy pasting several lines of codes obvioulsy a lot easier than installing a program as well as configuring the database for it.

  • Joe

    Looking for a good alternative to Google Analytics I met Metriclytics, I used the last few months and am very happy with the results and functionality. if anyone serves its website is http://www.metriclytics.com

  • http://www.pdvictor.com Peter Drinnan

    I am using Piwik because Google dropped the PDF report feature. Piwik saves me a lot of hassle there and the reports are automatically emailed to my clients. I can just sit back and forget about it – nice!

  • http://geniusgeeks.com Ricky

    Nice collection. I have already tried Mint and KISSmetrics. Both of them are decent alternatives to Google analytics. I would love to try out other mentioned services as well. Which service is superior based on your analysis?

  • http://kendal-i.co.uk Paul

    Piwiki – Great for sending out reports to clients that provide all the info in one shot, in a format that doesn’t immediately set the phone ringing with ‘what does this mean’. Little concerned that lately some page hits have not registered and not yet found out why (could be a theme issue) . Nice to have a central dashboard displaying just what you need and it keeps improving.
    GA – I could never ditch it, there are some really nice features and must have’s so it will always remain a useful tool – BUT Reports ! awful you would expect better.

  • wes

    KISSmetrics plans start at $150 after 14 days, according to their website

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