Last year, a survey by ratings agency Nielsen found that YouTube is the go-to platform for teenagers looking to listen to or discover new music. Indeed, online music streaming is so convenient that it’s easiest to just search for a song and play it online—and especially on YouTube.

Two other popular destinations to search for music are SoundCloud, which has a huge collection of user-uploaded tracks, and DailyMotion, which is a fantastic repository of music videos. Combine these with YouTube and you will probably be able to track down any song you want to listen to.

That’s the aim of Solayo—to make a cool online music player for regular users and let them tap into the resources of these three portals. And on top of that, it wants to build a mini social network for you to discover friends with similar tastes.
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Staying up late duplicating invoices, estimates and expenses? If you’re going to go nuts, at least do it in the right way! Hand over the work to a team of furry friends waiting to organize your small business financial needs, with Nutcache — the squirrelly company bringing you free, fast, and reliable online invoicing app.

There are so many different invoicing apps out there, but you’d be nuts to miss out on Nutcache’s online invoicing app. It’s free, which counts for a lot – especially if you are self-employed. Times are hard, and accounts are harder, which is why working with Nutcache can make your life a whole lot simpler and brighter – our diligent blue squirrels are certainly more appealing than fraying ring binders and paper cuts.

Nutcache’s free multilingual online application allows you to create unlimited personalized invoices and estimates. With insta-click client approval, your clients can review and approve estimates online, which means fast payments for you and simple approval for your clients.

Nutcache lets you make estimates for your clients, track the time you’ve spent on the projects, and invoice accurately and quickly, all for free. Your clients will be able to pay online securely with credit card or Paypal, and you’ll be able to quit worrying about making your invoices work nice and getting paid on time and be able to focus on your work — and still catch your favorite television show at night during the busy season.

Try NutCache Out This Week!

You’ve got to try NutCache out to see how easy it makes invoicing. It’s 100% free, so you’ve got nothing to lose — and once you see how much it simplifies life for you and your clients, you’ll want to keep using it forever. We loved it in our review, and are sure you’ll love it, too.

Think you’ve got a great app? Sign up for a Weekly Sponsorship slot just like this one.

For most people, internet suffixes are not something that are given a great deal of thought, but they are part of life online. Wherever you are in the world, you can visit google.com to access the global page for the search engine, but there are numerous international variants available as well — google.co.uk for the UK, google.fr for France, google.cn for China. You probably don’t consider the existence of many suffixes or TLDs (top level domains) beyond a familiar handful.

Wherever you are in the world, .com is universally recognized, but each country has its own version as well. These are the addresses that most companies and individuals want to bag for their site — they are the ones that matter. Of course there are numerous other familiar TLDs: .org for charities and non-profit organizations, .gov for official governmental sites, but this is far from being the end of the story.

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Twitter’s IPO yesterday gave the company an eye-watering market cap of over $24 billion, all for a company that got us to share our thoughts in 140 character public messages. Twitter has private messages, sure, but the value to advertisers is in those public messages. But not all communications is meant for public, and LINE — the hugely popular Asian private messaging app — is reportedly eying a $10 billion IPO for its decidedly not-public messaging service.

It’s insanely easy to share your thoughts with the world these days thanks to Twitter and Facebook, but it seems like it’s increasingly hard to privately message everyone. You’ll have some friends you need to email, some to private message on Facebook, others to WhatsApp or Line message, not to mention old-fashioned email, SMS, Skype, and traditional IM. You might even need to thrown Snapchat and BBM into the mix, and perhaps a few more obscure messaging apps to cover everyone. It’s quite the mess.

There’s simple ways to cross-post to multiple social networks at once (hello, IFTTT, Buffer, and the awesome Draft for iOS among others). But when it comes to private messaging, everything’s separate, which is quite the pain unless all of your friends, family, and colleagues prefer the same app for communications.

So: if you could pick one way to private message, and had to get rid of the rest, which would you pick? I’d personally pick email, old though it is, since it’s far richer than the other messaging tools. But there’s something to say for short and simple newer services — so how about you?

Email’s the original online communications tool, but it hasn’t aged as gracefully as it counterpart HTML in browsers. There’s so many different email clients and oddities in email rendering — not to mention the fact that email should be mobile first these days, with over 40% of messages opened on a mobile device — it’s terribly difficult to make a rich email message that looks great everywhere.

On the web, you could hand-code a responsive site, or you could just use a framework like Bootstrap or Foundation as the base for your site so you can focus on your design and forget about the complexities of making it work great everywhere. And now, you can do the same thing for HTML emails with ZURB’s new Ink responsive email framework.

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Working together with your team in the same room can be noisy and chaotic, and odds are you’ll get a lot less done thanks to constant distractions. People will stop in to tell you what they’re working on, or ask for help, or your manager will want updates on what you’re doing. That’s one of the many things that make remote work so enticing: it lets you find your own quiet zone to do your best work, and shut out all the distractions. Of course, then it’s tough to know what everyone’s working on.

That’s why the MetaLab Design team built the new Peak app. It’s the automated way to keep up with what everyone’s working on, and more, without taking up any of your team’s time for needless questions.

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Self-hosted web apps are a great option if you’re worried about your favorite service going offline. Google Reader’s shutdown has made that potential painfully obvious, and yet, most of the best alternate RSS services are still hosted apps that could be shutdown on a whim. Or, if they’re hosted on Amazon S3 like so many services are these days, they’ll go offline along with a significant portion of your apps if Amazon has a bad day.

JellyReader is a new, simple RSS reader app that, while not self-hosted yet, is designed to make sure you can never lose your RSS reader data. Instead of trusting someone else’s cloud with your data, it stores your feeds and saved articles in your Dropbox or Google Drive account.

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It’s easy to assume your customers love your products and services, or your readers love your site, until you get an angry email telling you how terrible your stuff is. Getting your customers’ ongoing feedback would be far better, but most people simply won’t take the time to fill out a survey or write you an email unless something is really bugging them.

What if there was a way to get feedback quickly without bugging your customers? That’s exactly what Temper is designed for.

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There’s Alfred and Quicksilver for the Mac, tools that make help you get tons done just with your keyboard. On the PC, there’s Launchy that does much the same thing. And even in apps like Sublime Text, you can just type in the Command Palatte to get stuff done without resorting to hard-to-remember keyboard shortcuts or your mouse.

On the web, though, the best alternate we have is bookmarklets — typically javascript-powered bits of code that make sharing and tweaking sites simple. In Safari, you can access the first 10 in your bookmarks bar with simple CMD+number shortcut, but everywhere else you’ll have to click your bookmarklet or make workarounds for the ones you use most. It’s far from the efficiency of keyboard-driven launchers.

That is, unless you install the new Backtick.

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The internet is constantly changing. It’s rare when a site stays the same for years — far more often, sites change so often that you almost can’t rely on older links at all. It’s a terrible problem for citing sites in research papers, and an even worse problem for historians and geeks who’d like to look back at the beginning of the internet, since it’s largely already disappeared.

That is, it would have all disappeared if the Internet Archive wasn’t around. This ambitious non-profit project aims to build the definitive internet library by snapshotting much of the crawalable web and makes it available for anyone to sort through in the Wayback Machine, among other projects. It’s an incredible tool to look back and see, say, how Apple.com looked in ’98, and it just recently got a facelift and an API that makes it even more useful.

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