We’re all recording videos more than ever on our smartphones and video cameras. However, editing them isn’t so simple.  In the past, I searched the internet for a good video editing program that can be used by an amateur like me. The majority of tools I came across during my search were either paid or simply too difficult to use till I came across WeVideo.

WeVideo is a very handy online video editor that makes editing videos a very simple task. You can upload videos from your computer or import them from cloud storage services and select the editing mode depending on your experience. Once done, all you have to do is edit the video by adding titles, themes and other effects, and you are done. The service also has a dedicated Android app that can help you edit videos on the go. (more…)

As a first-time dad of a two year old, I continually find myself being humbled by how much I have still to learn about being a great father. Every time I think I’ve got something down with my son, he throws a curve ball our way and we go back to the drawing board. I am realizing that this full time job — parenting — is one where I am constantly learning and seeking advice, and I don’t think it is ever going to stop.

My wife and I have found the web to be very helpful for a lot of answers to our questions that we have about our son, when it comes to simple issues like when to potty train, to more complex ones like “Why is our son not eating?” But, as we have found, we can spend hours on the web finding the answers to our questions and we can get many different opinions from people. That is great, but I would love to be able to condense that into one site — where hopefully the answers are all high quality.

As I was looking for answers to a question a few weeks ago, I stumbled upon Quib.ly, which is a question and answer site, similar to Quora and the like, but puts its focus on parenting and technology. Those are two areas where I can offer help and learn a great deal from so I thought I would give it a spin to see how beneficial it could be for me.

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Cloud has made our lives so easy on many fronts. A secure storage mechanism and robust collaboration options are star attractions of embracing the cloud. What’s disheartening is the fragmentation of services that cloud solutions offer. While Google Drive, Box and Dropbox are big players in the cloud space, they all stand for totally different things.

What one needs to stay productive is a solution that’s a combination of the three. From what I hear, Onehub comes close to what I am looking for. I immediately jumped on the opportunity to take it for a test drive. Care to know about results? Read on!
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Google’s geeky. Its homepage has always been spartan, and even the shade of blue used on its links are tested for performance. Its HQ is known for group bikes, indoor slides, yards mowed by goats and filled with inflatable deserts, the representatives of the web giant’s robot-themed mobile OS.

But Google’s also successful, wildly so. It’s a rare day when any internet connect human doesn’t touch at least one Google products. Not because we’re forced to, but because we want to. Google Search just works, and its popularity got us to try the rest of their apps. And you know what? Google Maps, Gmail, Docs, Chrome and more all work so good, most of us choose them because they work great. They may be spartan, but they sure do the job.

That’s not enough. The new Google, one increasingly infused with Google+ DNA since its launch 2 years ago, is focusing harder than ever on design. And features. And glasses, and driverless cars, and beating Dropbox, and more. It’s a busy — and shiny — new search giant, and that’s on showcase more than ever at this year’s Google I/O developer conference.

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Adobe Flash used to be an essential part of our daily internet experience, but today, it feels more like a relic of the past. No major mobile device today ships with Flash — Apple notably never included it in iOS, and then Adobe itself dropped mobile Flash on Android last August. Microsoft even curtailed Flash in Windows 8, limiting it to running Flash on a pre-approved sites in the new Modern IE.

Even still, on the desktop you’ll often find that you need to use Flash. That’s why our writer Nathan Snelgrove just wrote an article on our sister site Mac.AppStorm on the best ways to avoid using Flash on your Mac.

It’s aimed mainly at Safari users, and even recommends using Chrome for Flash since it’s built-into Chrome. But, if you’re an IE or Firefox user on a Windows or Linux PC who’d rather get around using Flash, it’s got enough tips that you might find some of them helpful.

Continue Reading at Mac.AppStorm…

The world’s not lacking for note apps; there’s tons out there, enough that when Google recently released a new one, the world collectively yawned. There’s just so many ways to keep notes already. There’s the plaintext geek favorite Simplenote, the always stylish Springpad, and Microsoft’s OneNote — the desktop app that made quite the nice transition to the web.

You’ve likely got a notes app built-into your OS of choice, too. And another in your email client. Even Dropbox itself makes a pretty compelling choice, as you can store plain text files in it and edit them as notes anywhere.

And yet, Evernote remains the crowd favorite. It lets you take notes about anything, throw in files, pictures, web clips, and more, and search through it all effortlessly. It lives in the web, but also has native apps for practically ever OS out there. It’s even in a Samsung fridge. It seems cluttered, with everything in one place, formatted text mixed with plain text and PDFs and everything else. And yet, it works – and is beloved by millions.

So, for those of you who swear by Evernote, what is it about the service that you love the most? We’d love to hear your thoughts — or your dissenting views if you hate Evernote — in the comments below.

I just recently ventured into creating my own website again. There is something about doing it that is so fulfilling for me. Over the years, I have learned a lot about websites by creating them, and have found what should and should not go into it. Now, don’t let me mislead you: I am no pro at this by any stretch of the imagination. In fact, when you start talking about coding, you lose me right away. But, what I have started to learn more and more about is using the amazing resources that are out there to help you create your own site. I am finding that you really don’t have to know how to code to help you come up with a decently good looking website.

Take for example, the app that I am reviewing today called Feeder Ninja, which does something so simple in nature, but yet can come in very handy when you are creating your own site. Feeder Ninja takes your social media feeds and creates an embedable  window that you can insert into your website. Again, simple in nature, but they make it so easy to do and it looks very professional.

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Since the announcement of the demise of Google Reader, many developers have started working on new projects that can help users replace Google Reader as their default RSS reader. Before the news hit the internet, the majority of people were reluctant to switch to any other RSS client as this one was one of the best and was available free of cost. Today, I stumbled yet another handy RSS reading client, Syndifeed.

Syndifeed is a very handy online RSS client that takes the simplicity of The Old Reader and feeling of Feedly. With Syndifeed, you can subscribe to all your favourite blogs and read them from where ever you are. Let’s take a look.

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If I could point out the most valuable asset on the internet these days, it would be honest feedback. That’s because people want to have their works evaluated, but the average user doesn’t want to review someone’s else project, especially at its early stages. When we want feedback, though, we usually want immediate results, and this void has created a market for quacks who say what you want to hear instead of how could you improve.

Often services that offer image display turn out as design showcases, regardless of their viability of comments. Hunie comes to change the game, as a place to host your designs and get honest feedback for a tiny price: your own critiques to other users sketches. It’s a pay it forward model that just might work.

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Like most people today, I prefer to save the majority of my files on cloud storage services, especially the work attachments I get in my emails. This helps me access my work files no matter where I am. For the past few days, I’ve been looking for a simple way to save all my attachments automatically to my Dropbox account so that I don’t have to upload them every time I receive an email. I did try IFTTT to see if I can create a recipe but it didn’t allow me to save the attachments in my Box or Dropbox account. It did save the copy of the email as text files, but that’s it.

Finally I found what I was looking for, in the form of Kloudless for Google Chrome.
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