Resizing images for your design work is a pain at best. You’ll likely need to use multiple sizes and aspect ratios of the same photos throughout your web designs, but manually tweaking each picture is too much trouble and simple bulk cropping will leave you with weirdly cut-off pictures. That’s why the brand-new sizzlepig is so amazing.

sizzlepig is a cloud-based tool that allows you to resize entire folders of images to unlimited sizes. No scripts, no guesswork. Scale, crop, name, compress, fine-tune, edit and preview, before your final images are ever created. No more excuses (sorry, but it’s not ok to cut off someone’s head in a photo because of a CMS).

Need lots of different sizes for lots of devices? sizzlepig scales to handle unlimited sizes, perfect for projects that demand pixel perfect images for mobile, desktop, tablet and more!

sizzlepig syncs with Box, Google Drive and Dropbox, allowing you to seamlessly integrate it into your workflow. Plus, if you ever need to add new images or replace old ones, sizzlepig saves all your settings. It automates your digital production projects and can cut your timelines over traditional batch script processes.

sizzlepig is the way to crop and scale photos in a way that no other desktop app can do. It lets you customize and process a lot of images in a lot of sizes quickly, with a true visual reference, in a way that’s at once totally different from and far better than the mass resizing we’ve all been forced to accept and expect.

Start Using sizzlepig This Week!

sizzlepig will save you hours of frustrating resizing and cropping — or trying to get your batch scripts to work right — and it won’t break the bank, either. You can use it to resize up to 100 pictures for free, and then get all the resizing you need done starting at $10/month.

Your designers, photographers, and everyone else who cares how images look in your designs will thank you.

Think you’ve got a great app? Sign up for a Weekly Sponsorship slot just like this one.

The prevalence and compactness of high quality photographic equipment today is fantastic. The always-there, always-on nature of the smartphone makes missing a photo opportunity a rare occurrence. We’ve always captured parties, weddings, births and graduations, but we’re now able to fill in the gaps between these big events by recording everyday happenings, which are often just as precious, and are usually a great deal more intimate. These life-documenting images are stored as digital files, so they are memories which we will forever have access to.

Well, it should be forever. But ever since digital photography became the norm, we’ve all shared one problem – what do you do with all those images? As a committed DSLR photographer, I’ve filled hard drives with my camera’s output alone, so the increased photographic output made possible by my phone is a serious problem. Sure, you can back up online, but most options are worrisome or expensive, or a combination of the two.

Both Google and Apple have, in recent times, sought to address this issue. Google+ and Photostream both provide automatic cloud backups, and both also provide later access to your images online. A new service called Loom (still in private beta) thinks it can do better still. It provides automatic backup, 5GB of free space, Mac and iOS apps, as well as a web interface. But does it provide a compelling alternative to the built-in OS backup systems?

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Internet forums and instant messaging would be nowhere without animated GIFs. They convey our shock, humour and disbelief, all in a series of crudely captured images — normally referencing movie scenes or TV shows. 4Chan would certainly be a much darker place, that’s for sure.

Due to the ‘Love it or Hate it’ viral voting system of the Internet, only the best GIFs are seen by millions.

Giphy is a large collection of GIFs created by a community of artists. Unlike more open communities such as Reddit, Giphy creations tend to be created from within the community as opposed to simply up-voted for popularity. Surely, the Internet has enough GIFs. Can this site offer anything we haven’t already seen?

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In the digital lives of today, chronology is everything. Our experiences are mapped out via timelines, and every turn of events is a narrative without a beginning or an end. This is a change of culture which has mostly been brought about by the concurrent social and mobile revolutions. Together, they have supplied us with the platforms and the technologies to make both real-time updates, and later access to them, a reality.

This functionality, of course, opens up the possibility of constructing compelling stories from real-life events. Sadly, the selection of elegant, reader-friendly tools with which we can deliver our reports is painfully limited. Social networks are nothing better than pragmatic, and the structure of a blog is not inherently suited to multimedia.

Hence, I’m very interested in trying Line. It is a new platform dedicated entirely to the creation of multimedia-rich timelines, and their subsequent presentation in a beautifully minimal, Medium-like design. But can it really provide the format that digital storytelling has been crying out for?

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Did I get geekier over the years or did coding just become mainstream? With so many youngsters online, it was foreseeable that a great share was peeking beneath the surface of the web at those huge walls of code. Using recent services, such as GitHub and StackOverflow, it has never been so easy to solve doubts and receive feedback. Communities became larger as new users flew into the adventure of creating code to call their own instead of relying on WordPress themes.

We still needed a tool to put all this learning to work — a truly universal service we could carry anywhere regardless of the inclemencies. That’s where CodeAnywhere stands out, offering the versatility of a web service and native alternatives to every mobile platform imaginable (there’s even a BlackBerry app!), without ever waiving the great features you’ll find out in this review.

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Bookmarking is far from dead. Sure, we reflexively Google for sites instead of looking through our bookmarks half the time, but when you find something awesome online, you know you’ll have to save it. We all do. That’s why our recent discussion about bookmarking brought in dozens of different apps and tools for bookmarking. It may look like madness, but we’ve all got a method to our madness, and we keep saving links.

But look through the discussion, through the apps people suggested, and you’ll find that most of them take several steps to save your bookmarks. Saving bookmarks directly in your browser doesn’t work so great these days unless you use the same browser on your phone and all of your computers.

That’s why Saved.io blew me away when I tried it out. The last thing I would have thought the web needed was a new bookmarking app, and yet, here was one that was so much simpler than everything else, it’s absolutely worth trying. (more…)

Not too long ago, I had this sudden realization that I really wanted to get out of Google’s products. I never dipped my feet too far into them, unlike some people, but the services I did use every day — Gmail, Reader, and Blogger —were either changing too much for my own liking or simply going extinct. After Reader’s demise, I switched to Feed Wrangler and didn’t look back. I moved my Blogger to Squarespace, and I’m in love.

Over the past couple weeks, I’ve been taking a much more significant challenge and moving all my email to FastMail. Before upgrading, I considered every other possible option. I read countless blogs and opinion pieces on what mail service to use, and none of them felt as up-to-date as they should be. It’s with that in mind that I wanted to take a closer look at the service.

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It was early spring 2011 when the MetaLab team announced their intentions to make a brand new task management app for the web: Flow. With their signature style, the MetaLab team made a beautifully designed web app for managing tasks — only this web app didn’t feel like a web app. It worked so nicely that our former editor compared it to the best native Mac apps and picked it as his go-to todo list app. He wasn’t the only one: organizations around the globe from the likes of Adobe and MIT picked Flow as the app to help them manage tasks.

Along the way, Flow has picked up companion iOS and Mac apps, and even had a personal assistant tool built in for a time. But behind the scenes, Flow was being recreated for 2013 to be the very best task app all over again. The new Flow was just released yesterday, and it’s better than ever. Here’s why Flow can easily compete with the best task apps on any platform.

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Wunderlist is easily one of the greatest simple todo list apps ever made. It’s one of the few todo list apps that most computer users would have almost definitely have heard of before. But then, it took off so well because it was free — combine that with native apps for almost every platform, including PCs with less todo list app options than the Mac and mobile platforms, and it seemed unstoppable.

That was only supposed to be the first stepping stone for the 6Wunderkinder team, though. They originally intended Wunderlist to be a basic free todo list app, then to follow up with Wunderkit as their pro collaboration app. That plan got scuttled, though, and instead they doubled down on Wunderlist, adding pro accounts and team features. The pro accounts brought task assignment, subtasks, and new backgrounds back in April, but with this month’s updates, Wunderlist now makes perfect sense as a great team collaboration app without making their simple todo list app any more difficult to use.

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The modern browser is becoming more than just a tool to get to the internet. It’s now almost synonymous with our usage of a computer itself. Most of the things we do are online, and a lot of times, each task requires certain websites to do the job.

OverTask, an extension for Google Chrome, wants to help you sort through the websites you visit when you are doing anything. It’s been getting a lot of buzz about its ability to automatically “convert tabs into tasks”. It’s unclear how that works, but we were intrigued and took it for a spin.

Unfortunately, OverTask seems as confused in its execution as it does in its idea.

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