Automatically Upload Photos and More With Wappwolf

We’re all looking for ways to make things easier, and anything that can be done to simplify or speed up things that you do regularly can be a great boost to productivity. Some of our favorite web apps are designed specifically to speed up routine tasks, such as IFTTT and Wappwolf. We’ve looked at Wappwolf in the past, but this time, we’re back with tutorials that that can help you put Wappwolf and Dropbox to work for you.

There’s tons you can do with Wappwolf, but this time, we’re going to look at how you can use it with eBooks and photos. All you need to do is upload files to your Dropbox account, and Wappwolf will do the heavy lifting of archiving files, uploading images to Facebook and much more. Let’s get started.

Introducing Wappwolf

Wappwolf is designed to make web apps work together and automate moving files around your web apps so you can be more productive. If you’ve ever wanted to tie your Dropbox files together with Evernote, Facebook, your Kindle, and more, Wappwolf is the tool you need. It can be configured to monitor particular folders in your Dropbox account, and when certain types of files are uploaded to it you can trigger actions that will save you time and effort. Upload an image, and it can, say, post it to Facebook and then archive it in another Dropbox folder. There’s so much you can do with this, if you just think of the workflows you need automated.

To get started, pay a visit to the Wappwolf website and click either the ‘Try now!’ button or the Login / Sign Up link at the top of the page, if you’ve never tried it out before. You then need to connect the service to your cloud storage, so click the Connect Dropbox button.

You’ll need to connect Wappwolf to your Dropbox account to allow it to work its magic.

You’ll need to connect Wappwolf to your Dropbox account to allow it to work its magic.

Sign into your Dropbox account when prompted to do so and click the Allow button to grant Wappwolf access to your account.

You’ll immediately be invited to create your first automation, and you’ll need to choose a folder that should be used as the trigger. To start with we’re going to be working with photos, so select a folder to which you are going to be uploading image files. If you’re using the new automatic mobile photo upload in Dropbox on your phone or tablet, you’ll likely want to select that uploads folder.

The automations you create are triggered by the folders you choose to add files to.

The automations you create are triggered by the folders you choose to add files to.

Push Photos to Facebook

For our first automation we’re going to simplify the process of working with photos you want to share with others. You can create a task so that when you add photos to a specific folder they will first be posted to Facebook for you, all of the images will be added to an archive for backup purposes and then original files then deleted.

Scroll through the list of available tasks at the top of the screen and click the ‘Photo upload to facebook’ button.

Photos you upload can be shared to a number of other sites including Facebook.

Photos you upload can be shared to a number of other sites including Facebook.

Just as you connected Wappwolf to your Dropbox account, you will have to do the same with your Facebook account. Click ‘Connect to Facebook’, sign into your account and click Allow.

You’ll need to give Wappwolf access to Facebook if you want to share photos in this way.

You’ll need to give Wappwolf access to Facebook if you want to share photos in this way.

If you like, you can opt to add a comment to any images you upload as well as specifying which Facebook album they should be added to. When you’re happy with your settings, click Add Action.

You could leave things there, but we want to do more. Scroll down the page until your find the ‘Any file’ section and select the ‘Zip the file’ option. Choose your preferred archive format form the drop down menu and then click Add Action.

By layering up several actions, Wappwolf can perform quite complex operations.

By layering up several actions, Wappwolf can perform quite complex operations.

To avoid duplication it makes sense to delete the original files after they have been zipped up. Scroll down to the Advanced section, select ‘Delete the original file’ option and click Add Action. Now you can click the ‘finished?’ button at the top of the page and test out the automation by uploading an image to your designated folder.

Send eBooks to Kindle

How many times have you encountered a file online and thought how useful it would be to have it sent to your phone or tablet so you can access it when you away from your computer? Using Wappwolf you can create an automation that makes this possible.

In this next example we’re going to create an automation so that when you upload a Word or text file to a particular folder in Dropbox, converted to PDF and then sent to your Kindle address. We’ll also backup the files to Google Drive for good measure.

Click the ‘Create a new automation button’ and select the Dropbox folder that should be used as the trigger. From the actions at the top of the page click ‘Convert to pdf’ and then click the Add Action button.

Converting to PDF format is just one of the conversion options available in Wappwolf.

Converting to PDF format is just one of the conversion options available in Wappwolf.

Now click the Automate Kindle button in the Documents section, and select the ‘Sent it to your kindle’ option. You can then specify the email address you’d like to send to, and the address that it should be sent from – as this page points out, you’ll have to check your Kindle settings if you are unsure of which email address to send to.

Sending documents to Kindle makes them available on other devices in an instant.

Sending documents to Kindle makes them available on other devices in an instant.

To complete the automation, we want to backup out files to Google Drive – it’s good to have copies of files stored in more than one location.

Click the ‘Connect to Google’ button, log into your Google account and click the ‘Grant access button. Choose which folder the files should be uploaded to, click Add Action and you’re ready to test your automation.

Taking it Further

These are just a couple of examples of how Wappwolf can be used. In this article we have focused on working with Dropbox, but the service can also be used on conjunction with Google Drive and Box.net.

What have used Wappwolf to automate? Share your ideas in the comments.


  • Simon

    I have a folder in Google Drive called ‘Drive=>Evernote”. I save to that folder and stuff appears in Evernote! Clever part is, there is a subfolder that appears automatically called ‘Processed’. Periodically I go to that folder and place items in their permanent Drive directory. So anything I want to have easy access to is in both places.

  • Graeme

    I use WW loads for a project of mine. I set my system to upload a high res photo to Dropbox then WW rotates it copies it by FTP to my server, rotates it, scales it and sends it to Facebook, twitter and Flickr

    It’s a great service

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