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Social Networking

Between Facebook, Twitter and RSS feeds, the number of links that are shared with me on a regular basis is, to put it mildly, crazy. So I’m always on the lookout for solutions that promise to make some sense out of this truckload of random information coming my way, and even a way to aggregate these links and find the best ones.

Likehack is the latest contender to promise those features, and it’s actually a bit different from what I expected. I signed up for the service thinking I would get a list of all the links I get, auto-sorted by categories like images, videos and articles. Instead, Likehack works behind the scenes to actually suggest the most important links it thinks I would like, once you’ve connected it to all of your accounts. So far, so good. (more…)

The web is built on sharing. A lot of us use social networks repeatedly throughout each day to either share our own content or that which others have created with the overall intention of ensuring that everyone can benefit from the quirky content or knowledge that creators introduce to the web. However, this content is usually displayed beneath our Twitter handle, Facebook name or other social network identity which means we can be a lot more unconsciously selective about which content we pay more attention to, based on who has posted it.

Imagine if we could see the content first, with no names attached – only the number of friends that have shared it. With Potluck, this is the case. Read on to find out more about Potluck – the latest brainchild of the group behind the innovative Branch discussion platform. (more…)

I’ve tried archival services for Twitter in the past, and they can be terribly handy when you need to find a link you shared in the past or some old conversation you had months back. Journalists, especially, are likely to end up finding the services very useful. But now that I’ve been using App.net a lot more, I’ve started searching for apps that would help me search through my ADN account.

I ended up stumbling upon a web service called Watermark.io, provided by Riverfold Software (the same developer behind the fantastic Tweet Library archive service). Watermark.io supports not only my ADN archive, but also my Twitter archive, which makes it great no matter which social network you prefer — and especially great if you use both services a lot.

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When I started an online jewelry store a few years back, I discovered the advantages of creating a Facebook page to promote my products. I had a decent number of following at the time, and it was a great move that made my business grow with the support of people I knew in real life.

Years have passed, but my Facebook page remained the same. I was looking into giving it a makeover when I chanced upon Decor, a very helpful web app for creating Facebook pages. In this article, I’ll show you how someone that has zero coding knowledge — like me — can create professional pages in just a matter of minutes.

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As a first-time dad of a two year old, I continually find myself being humbled by how much I have still to learn about being a great father. Every time I think I’ve got something down with my son, he throws a curve ball our way and we go back to the drawing board. I am realizing that this full time job — parenting — is one where I am constantly learning and seeking advice, and I don’t think it is ever going to stop.

My wife and I have found the web to be very helpful for a lot of answers to our questions that we have about our son, when it comes to simple issues like when to potty train, to more complex ones like “Why is our son not eating?” But, as we have found, we can spend hours on the web finding the answers to our questions and we can get many different opinions from people. That is great, but I would love to be able to condense that into one site — where hopefully the answers are all high quality.

As I was looking for answers to a question a few weeks ago, I stumbled upon Quib.ly, which is a question and answer site, similar to Quora and the like, but puts its focus on parenting and technology. Those are two areas where I can offer help and learn a great deal from so I thought I would give it a spin to see how beneficial it could be for me.

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When Google announced that they planned to close Reader on July 1, the online community’s reaction varied from surprised approval, to shocked horror. Google’s decision was based on the flagging number of users who still use feeds in preference to social media.

But as any self-respecting RSS aficionado will know, flicking through your tweets, or browsing your Facebook timeline, isn’t the best way of finding interesting content. Until now, though, there have been very few services providing a halfway house between feeds and social media.

Rockmelt, which was once a socially-orientated web browser, has been reinvented as a social media-based, feed-reading network. But is Rockmelt‘s new course bound for being accepted as a great new way to read the news, or is it heading more in the direction of the doomed FriendFeed? Let’s see.

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The social media revolution has undoubtedly broadened our social horizons, but, in my case certainly, it has also broadened the spectrum of online chores to be completed on a daily basis. Keeping up with social media appearances, and the content-hunting which that entails, can easily turn into a full-time vocation.

There are already some apps at hand to ease this burden. Schedulers, like Hootsuite and Buffer, allow you to designate a time at which your posts and tweets should be sent out. Both of these services, and some of their competitors, also offer analytics, meaning you can track how popular each of your missives has been. Services like Feedly make the process of content-gathering easier, although trawling through a catalogue of feeds isn’t a quick process.

A new invite beta-stage startup, called Swayy, aims to streamline these processes into one, simple workflow. Swayy offers a stream of shareable content tailored to your choice of subjects, along with scheduling and analytics options. But can Swayy really be the master of all trades?

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I’ll come right out and admit it: I’m a sucker for good design. And while there are many sites which allow you to browse cool and well designed products, sites like Pinterest rarely actually link you to a place where you can purchase said product. This leaves me wondering whether or not the device actually exists and, if it does, it’s almost impossible to find the product.

However, I recently came across Fancy, a social network and eCommerce hybrid website for well designed products. It’s Pinterest meets eCommerce, in the best of ways. Let’s take a look.

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Everyone that used to love Google Reader is having to quickly search for a new RSS reader, now that Google Reader’s getting shut down. Many users seem to be headed for Feedly, while some, like our own Mathew Guay, have opted to set up their own servers with Fever, and a few are heading for The Old Reader. All of these services have been under duress since the announcement, feverishly adding bandwidth and servers in an effort to keep pace with their new-found popularity.

Me? I honestly think I am leaning towards startup Feedspot. I have tried both Feedly and The Old Reader. Both are nice, but I can not say much beyond that. Feedspot, on the other hand, may be the app that hits the spot for me. (more…)

I admire app developers that are willing to take a fresh look at what they have developed after releasing something for a while. It shows that they are passionate and believe in what they are building, not only for themselves, but for the general population as a whole. In my opinion, it takes a lot to be able to swallow your pride a little, take in user feedback and be willing to tweak a product or app so that it can better meet the demand for the user.

The reason why I am reflecting on this is that I have been using Kippt for the past couple of days and have been really impressed by what they have done to their app. They haven’t necessarily done a full facelift to it, but they were able to analyze how well the app worked and took user feedback to produce an even better product than before. If you are unfamilar with Kippt, we did a review on their old version a couple of years ago.

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