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It’s always assumed that 37signals’ Basecamp is the father of all project management apps. As such, it’s only natural for new apps that tackle the task to sprout up around the web, all hoping for a chance at taking the title. Whether it be creating an incredible interface to challenge that of its rivals or making the move of offering access to the app for incredibly cheap (or even free), these apps all try and bring something new to the table.

One such app that presents an incredible simplistic approach to project management is named Blimp. (more…)

There are so many good books to read, movies to watch, and music to listen to. I don’t know about you, but I always find myself without enough time in the day to be able to sit down and just dive into a good book. Then, there are those times when I hear a good song on the radio and I try to remember it so I can buy it later, but that never works. I am not sure if it’s because I am getting older (I am really not that old), but I cannot seem to remember things unless I write them down.

I have been using a web app called Done Note Done to jot down some of the books, music, and movies that I want to check out. It has been a good way for me to keep track of all the things that I want to get to later – with a dash of social networking thrown in. Granted, you can use your favorite task manager for this as well, but this app may just get me to read and watch more movies. Let’s take a deeper look into Done Not Done.


Over the past few years as a Software Engineer, I’ve worked on several Enterprise grade projects. That means tight, ridiculous deadlines on our part. When that happens, no one, QA leads included, cares about quality as long as your code is in the code base on time. No, the regret comes later when all hell break loose.

Once I worked with a guy who checked in some half-cooked code just to close the issue for then before it sets the alarm bell ringing within. However, that particular piece of code completely went on to run for hours and blew up in our face when the app went live. By then a slew of modules were built over this, and we (cough I cough) had to revisit it later on, make numerous changes to the design before that flow was usable. In this process we wasted several thousand dollars which could have been avoided if we had some sort of process in place. Sadly, most of the software world works the same way.

Big Deal! Hire a performance guy and optimize the DB performance, some might suggest. As valid as the idea is, not all bottlenecks are I/O related, though traditionally this is where most applications fail. It could be due to a poor coding as well or lack of sufficient hardware power. NewRelic is a service which analyses these issues and help you optimize your product. Does it work? Join me after the jump to find out.


Most of us have a lot we need to do each day. We need a way to record everything that needs to be done, and be reminded with our tasks are due. In the past, people would have used a diary or a notepad, but nowadays we need something more sophisticated to keep up with our bustling lives.

For a while now, I have been looking for the best app for this, and while there’s many nice ones, I never could find the perfect app for me. That is, until a few weeks ago I discovered Cloudship, an app which looked as good as it performed — for me this was the perfect application.

Two weeks on and I’m using Cloudship everyday to manage and organize my everyday life. Read on to find out where Cloudship can fit into your everyday life.


When my mother gifted me a copy of Haruki Murakami’s IQ84 a few weeks ago, I felt weird holding reading material in my hands. I suddenly realized that most of the reading I did through 2012 was on screens, and consisted mainly of blog posts and articles online. While I’m not happy that my balance of reading literature and non-fiction is totally out of whack, I now understand that reading online is undeniably a big part of my life.

That said, it’s great to have tools to keep track of what you read on the web — I subscribe to RSS feeds aplenty using Google Reader, save stuff for later with Pocket, and have set up a recipe with IFTTT to push links from my favorited tweets to Pocket as well. But wouldn’t it be nice to have a community of fellow fans of longform content, to share new things to read with? Enter Readingly.


If you use Facebook, chances are you’ve written about what’s going on in your life, RSVP’ed for events, liked your favorite groups, posted photos, and more. You might have your education, employment, relationships, religion, and favorite quirky quotes listed for all the world to see. If you’ve tagged photos with location and people, you’ll have quite a clear record online of the people you spend time with and the places you’ve been. Or, you might just have a history full of spamming your friends for help growing carrots on your flourishing fake farm.

Either way, there’s a ton you can find out about yourself from your Facebook profile, data that’s sitting there ready to be mined. It used to take going to each of your friends’ profiles to find out this info, but with Facebook’s new Graph Search, it’s just a click away. We’ve just gotten access to it, so here’s a quick look at the newest iteration of the world’s most popular social network, and how it might affect the way you use it. (more…)

Lists may not seem like the most exciting basis for a website, but everyone has the need to create some form of list from time to time. List creation and management need not be a solitary affair – there are countless scenarios in which two or more people might want to make use of the same list.

From shopping lists and to-dos to project management and itineraries, Organisr is an online tool that replaces those all-too-easily-lost scraps of paper that probably litter your desk. (more…)

The internet continues to amaze me all the time, and that is one of the reasons why I love it so much. What really gets me passionate about consistently using the web is the ability to do things in a virtual world that before wasn’t possible. Take for example the topic of collaboration. In years past, you wouldn’t dream of being able to have a company or business where the people who work at it are all in different states or countries.

A perfect example of this is Web.Appstorm, where although I have been writing for them for almost a year now, I have never met my editor or the other writers face to face. Yet, we are able to work together and produce quality content for all of you to read.

So where am I going with this? Well, the internet has given us the opportunity to have no boundaries when it comes to getting work done together. One web app to help with this, called Dispatch, has given us the ability to collaborate on documents and other things regardless of whether we work in the same building or miles a part, and all we need is an internet connection.


It’s always exciting when web apps we’ve tried get a redesign that makes them far better than they used to be. MYCO Suite is a CRM and collaboration app that we’d looked at in the past. We liked it, but felt that its interface held it back. Since then, though, the app has gone through a major overhaul and it’s time to take another look.

Let’s see how MYCO Suite has improved in the last year, and how it can work for your business. (more…)

You don’t get a great deal free these days, so the prospect of 50GB of online storage is an opportunity to be jumped at. There are many cloud storage services to choose from – Dropbox, Skydrive, Box and more – but free storage tends to limited to around 5GB.

Megaupload closed just over a year ago after intervention from the US Department of Justice, but the company’s founder, Kim Dotcom, is not a man to give up without a fight. One year later to the day, Mega was launched with possibly the most generous free package you’ll find. Generous enough, that we had to take a look.


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