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File Management

Another day, another file sharing app, or so it seems. We’re spoiled for choice when it comes to services for sending files big and small over the web, and while it may seem like overkill, the truth is that today’s users are diverse in their usage habits and requirements, and a one-size-fits-all approach just doesn’t work in this context. So who is Shared good for?

Shared doesn’t bother with apps for multiple platforms or syncing files across devices: instead, it offers a cheap, easy-to-use web-based file sharing solution that works on desktops and mobile devices and is perfect for novice users and advanced file sharers who are tired of bloated apps with features they don’t use. Plus, you can get started with 100GB of space for free! Sound too good to be true? Let’s send some files across the interwebs and see if Shared is indeed all it’s cracked up to be.

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I’m a huge Dropbox junkie. I’ve got 19 GB of free space that I’ve managed to secure over the years (being a student and inviting friends used to help, especially before Dropbox really exploded over the past few years). But cloud storage is tricky, and I’m the paranoid type who believes you should never rely on only one storage solution — even if it is “in the cloud.”

I was intrigued when I heard about another cloud-solution that claimed to offer a few advantages to the Dropbox setup. It’s called NTI MiST. NTI has been in the software game for a long time, and have seen tremendous success in the industry. Read on to find out whether MiST continues to improve on their sterling reputation, or if it can replace or work alongside Dropbox.

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Sadly, much of the work done by those in the creative arts isn’t terribly creative. This isn’t because all the talented designers, musicians, film-makers and photographers out there aren’t capable of producing works of stunning originality. It is actually due to the irritatingly small amount of time that they can dedicate to making beautiful things, and the frustratingly large volume of time dedicated to the trials associated with a service-based profession.

One such trial is the toing and froing of work between the professional and the client. Many of the platforms that are technically capable of performing this task are not focused on the client-facing niche of file sharing, and as a result, few prioritize both straightforward operation and high quality presentation.

This is why I think the concept of Sitedrop, a new beta hot off the Betaworks press, makes sense. Based on Dropbox for storage and hosting, Sitedrop wants to make the delivery of your work within a beautiful interface as simple as moving a file. Is that too much to ask? (more…)

The file storage and sharing marketplace is a landscape heavily populated with services. There’s good reason for this: a lot of people need to move a lot of files about, a lot of the time. Little wonder, then, that Dropbox is valued at over $4bn, and Box has managed to raise, over several rounds of funding, a total of $309m. These heavyweights provide large amounts of storage and access to files via nearly any internet-connected device.

In recent times, though, a slightly different, nimbler, quicker kind of platform has become popular. The first of this type – and, perhaps, the genre-defining player in this field – was Droplr. Since its launch in 2009, it has provided a remarkably simple and fast method of getting files online and shared. A younger competitor, CloudApp, has also entered mainstream use, and clearly there are plenty more startups which feel that this is still a lucrative file-storage niche.

One such service is Cloudup. The unique selling point of this cloud platform is its delivery of uploaded files, of nearly any type, in streams, which act as multimedia playlists. But is this focus on the recipient really the new, killer feature in the crowded file-sharing arena?

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Back in old days, converting files from one format to another was a hectic task. There was (and still) a software for every type of format that you must install to convert your files. However, those days are gone; we are now surrounded by a number of cloud services that makes these tasks simpler. Currently, everything is done in the cloud – file conversion, storage, sharing and anything you can think of. There are online services that allow users to convert any type of file. Rather than finding different services for different formats, head over to CloudConvert and it will not disappoint you.

CloudConvert is a simple and easy-to-use online utility that can help you convert over 100 different formats – whether it’s audio, e-books, videos, images or anything for that matter, the website supports them all. The service supports over a 100 file formats from many different categories and is totally free of cost. The service also integrates with multiple cloud storage services so that you can automatically save the converted files in the cloud.

Let’s take it for a spin and see if it’s worth keeping as a part of your app repertoire.

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Collaborating online with a team is still in its infancy. You’ll need to daisy chain a few different apps to get done things with as little friction as possible. There isn’t yet a “one app to rule them all” in sight. When you have to switch back and forth between multiple apps to collaborate, the focus and productivity levels take a hit.

I’m like curious George when it comes to discovering apps. I’m only too happy to try them all as and when they are launched. Except when it comes to team collaboration apps. It’s one vertical that still feels like snake oil and if you remove the branding and fancy copy, almost all of them have the same set of features.

Volerro got my attention with the bold proclamation that it can help users create, refine and distribute content. It’s the creation part that got my attention. No app is better in that aspect except for Google Docs. So, I had to try out this app and benchmark it against the competition.
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The web is chock-full of cloud storage services these days, and that’s actually a good thing: you can choose from a vast range of apps with different features and pricing and opt for one that suits your needs and budget perfectly. I personally prefer Dropbox because it lives on my desktop, syncs files across all my devices and allows for easy file sharing with clients, colleagues, bandmates and friends.

Suyara is the latest contender to enter the ring, and comes in a-swinging with multiple plans for home and business users, a flexible file management UI, file previews and more. Today we’re going to pair up this new service from Spain to see how it fares against the heavyweights, and whether it can knock out the competition. Let’s glove up!

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These days, there seems to be countless services that can be used to host and share files. The likes of Dropbox, Box and Google Drive are understandably popular, but they all have limitations of one form or another. There’s hosts of smaller, less popular apps, but then you risk whether or not they’ll be around forever.

If you need a more flexible solution, ownCloud could be just what you’re looking for, giving you the chance to easily host and access your files from other computers. You can run it on your own server, or host it on a number of hosting services easily. It just might be the Dropbox alternate you’ve been needing.

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You don’t get a great deal free these days, so the prospect of 50GB of online storage is an opportunity to be jumped at. There are many cloud storage services to choose from – Dropbox, Skydrive, Box and more – but free storage tends to limited to around 5GB.

Megaupload closed just over a year ago after intervention from the US Department of Justice, but the company’s founder, Kim Dotcom, is not a man to give up without a fight. One year later to the day, Mega was launched with possibly the most generous free package you’ll find. Generous enough, that we had to take a look.

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The digital world is full of cloud storage and other related services. It’s definitely not a new idea — Dropbox has been on the task for years, and it wasn’t even the first — but ever since Apple decided to go iCloud, other corporations and entrepreneurs saw an opportunity to grab the market. There’s really nothing wrong with Dropbox, though. It’s been a solid service since its inception in 2008 and it’s been constantly improving, trying to develop the best user experience possible.

Then, in all the glory of this cloud giant, a new threat surfaced. Its name is SugarSync, the simple, yet efficient alternative to Dropbox. Interestingly enough, it too was launched in 2008, but it didn’t take off like Dropbox. Now, the developers have begun a new version — 2.0 — of the service and released it in the form of a public beta. The company says it “merges power and simplicity” becoming “the simplest cloud to use”. Can this bring a new wave of competition to such a longstanding foe as Dropbox? (more…)

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