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Phillip Gruneich

Brazilian screenwriter working as a copywriter and a technology fan. Check my site for some iOS automatization tips or look at me on Twitter (@pgruneich) or App.net (@philg).

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Get Things Done with Nirvana

Getting Things Done, as a concept carved by David Allen in 2001, has aged fast. Users of the method have been shaping its recommendations to fit their needs, but, most importantly, they did so to catch up on how technology could help them get things done with less friction. Apps have also developed their own ways to support some sort of easy path to achieve productivity and the starting point from Getting Things Done soon deviated into several personal methods.

As a Mac user, I’m very familiar with the dispute between Omnifocus and Things, being a previous user of the latter and considering the jump to the previous until I reached out for the web and found Nirvana, which felt like a better deal coming from Things, which manages tasks with Next Actions and Today lists, rather than Omnifocus with its Forecast and the reliance of due dates.

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Get More Out of Your Bookmarks With Diigo

There has been 10 years since the first version of Delicious, a social bookmarking app, was released and the world never looked back on how they archived their favorite web sites. Delicious was neglected until not long ago, but, by that moment, newer services seized its throne, such as Pinboard.

Diigo has been around since 2005 and it moved away from similar apps over time by offering tools to highlight and annotate on web pages. The service raised the bar with the inclusion of collaborative and social network and its recent redesign was the icing on the cake to transform Diigo into a standout utility.

Join us to find out the best ways to use Diigo’s resourceful features.

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Take Your Code With You Using CodeAnywhere

Did I get geekier over the years or did coding just become mainstream? With so many youngsters online, it was foreseeable that a great share was peeking beneath the surface of the web at those huge walls of code. Using recent services, such as GitHub and StackOverflow, it has never been so easy to solve doubts and receive feedback. Communities became larger as new users flew into the adventure of creating code to call their own instead of relying on WordPress themes.

We still needed a tool to put all this learning to work — a truly universal service we could carry anywhere regardless of the inclemencies. That’s where CodeAnywhere stands out, offering the versatility of a web service and native alternatives to every mobile platform imaginable (there’s even a BlackBerry app!), without ever waiving the great features you’ll find out in this review.

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5 Apps to Create Amazing Lists

Who doesn’t love lists? They’re a great way to organize information and scribble quick thoughts from the top of your head. They’re a nice way to digest information quickly — after all, how many times have you scrolled through these AppStorm round-ups just checking if one app grabbed your attention? I certainly have.

Truth be told, lists are everywhere. When you check a forum, it displays a list of threads; a Google search shows a list of results; and most of the services you use that are focused on content present their information as lists, one way or another. Perhaps we can assume that the whole information architecture of the web is based on lists.

There’s one thing missing, though: your lists. Where are you keeping them? Join us in this round-up to find the best app for you.

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Leaving Google: Apps to Not Be Evil

The last few months have been a wake-up call for anyone who cares about privacy. But perhaps it’s just been another headline blocking your way to the last round of sports, because I’ll tell you one truth: the generation I’m part of just doesn’t care about privacy. We all knew Google and most free services were grabbing our data and serving us ads. We grew up with that routine, so much so that some of us learned to share online before we got into math. This behavior is so prevalent that the upcoming generations have their fates sealed already, with their pictures being exposed all over the internet sometimes before they’re even born. It’s like The Truman Show, with many, many Trumans.

Yet, I didn’t leave Google due to privacy, I did so because of its use of my private data. Using Google daily and being targeted with its ads is like having a bad fight with your best friend, when he uses your darkest shared secrets against you. After a chain of events, the dismissal of Reader and the new ads in Gmail camouflaged within your inbox, I decided it was time to jump out. That’s what I did and I’m here to tell you how.

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Whenever I find a service claiming that it “collects and organizes files”, I wonder “Why?”. This is not only curiosity, but an essential part of what we do here: “What’s the purpose of a new app of this kind in a world with Evernote and Springpad?”. This helps digging into the mind of its creators, allowing us to guess what issue made the developers think of a new solution.

Thus it is, when inquiring why a service such as Iceber.gs is born. Were its developers unaware of its competition or it definitely brings something completely new to the game? Let’s find out together — and then if you like it, we’ve got some exclusive early access codes for you below!

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Blogging has changed. When the first blogging services started popping around ’98, most people used them as open diaries. Over time, blogs went further, and the concept of a diary fell apart. Still, they were still personal, but instead of carrying the events of our days, we now write opinions we believe are worth sharing (and some still use them as diaries — they’re just fewer and farther between). From diaries to opinion repositories, there’s one quality of blogs that’s never vanished: they’re personal.

Not only have bloggers reshaped their content, but the platforms have followed the transformation as well. From WordPress and Blogger to Tumblr and more, customization has always been an essential part of blogging. It’s like hanging pictures in your bedroom, making your space feel yours. Then came the digital magazines, like Svbtle and Medium, and theming became passé. Personality became lodged in the content. Now comes Roon, which abdicates most of the customization to leave place to what defines our generation: content.

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If you’re a designer — or an aspiring designer, or perhaps just someone who loves seeing beautiful pixel art — you’ve surely heard of Dribbble. The “Twitter for designers”, of a sort, Dribbble is the place to showcase shots of your latest design creations. It’s hardly a new site, and we actually reviewed it originally 3 years ago.

I’ve been playing around as designer for the past few months, especially after I was drafted on Dribbble. Then I wondered about going Pro, because, you know, the badge fits my color palette and I thought: “What if our readers ponder the same thing?”. So we’ll be looking through the pros and cons of going Pro on Dribble and by the end of the article I’ll be drafting one of our readers. That’s today’s game.

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If I could point out the most valuable asset on the internet these days, it would be honest feedback. That’s because people want to have their works evaluated, but the average user doesn’t want to review someone’s else project, especially at its early stages. When we want feedback, though, we usually want immediate results, and this void has created a market for quacks who say what you want to hear instead of how could you improve.

Often services that offer image display turn out as design showcases, regardless of their viability of comments. Hunie comes to change the game, as a place to host your designs and get honest feedback for a tiny price: your own critiques to other users sketches. It’s a pay it forward model that just might work.

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The world is different now. If you’re reading this article, you’re already connected with people around the world online, and our own writing team hails from a number of different countries. Now you don’t need to leave your country to work and shop beyond your border.

There’s tons of essential apps that help us all work online and be more productive in today’s interconnected world, but there’s one service that, more than any other, makes global work and commerce actually work: PayPal. The payment juggernaut owned by eBay is the handiest way to transfer money overseas without all the bureaucracy of dealing with banks.

If you sell stuff online, you’ll likely get paid via PayPal, so why not use PayPal to pay for all of your online services? There’s one problem: everyone doesn’t accept PayPal payments. Let’s look at the most popular services that don’t work with PayPal, and the alternates you can use with PayPal instead.

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